St. Clair County Biographies   -   Make Investments in Your Local Historical Society
St. Clair County Biographies From the 1883 History of St. Clair County MO, National Historical Co.
Biographies A-F Biographies G-M Biographies N-Z
ANDREW NAYLOR was born in Highland County, Ohio, November 19, 1852. His father,. James H. Naylor, was a native of that county and was born in 1818. His mother, formerly Jane Kincaid, came originally from the same state. They had seven children, Andrew being the youngest. When seven years of age the family moved to Brown County, Ohio, and lived there until 1867, when they settled in Henry County, Missouri, near Windsor. From December, 1867, to the spring of 1868 he attended school at Clinton, Missouri. In 1868 he was engaged at the trade of carriage painting, which he continued two years. Going to Butler, Missouri, he worked at that trade till September, 1872, when he came to Appleton City and clerked with different firms until January, 1883. He then established himself in the grocery trade. Mr. Naylor was married January 18, 1878, to Miss Sarah B. Hodkins, of Ohio, a daughter of James Hodkins. They have one child, Charles A. He is a member of the Masonic order. GEORGE ALFRED NEAL was born December 17, 1856. His grandfather, James Neal, a native of Virginia emigrated to Kentucky at an early day. Moses W., the father of George, was born in Kentucky, October 7, 1825. He married Miss Lucretia A. King. He was for many years a popular hotel man in Kentucky. In 1858, he removed to Indiana. At the outbreak of the war he enlisted in the Thirty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was commissioned first lieutenant on the 31st of December, 1862. He fell mortally wounded at the battle of Murfreesboro. The subject of this sketch is the oldest of three living children. He commenced attending the public schools of Indiana, when five years of age, and after his father's death he returned with his mother to Kentucky. At the age of fifteen he entered Smithfield College and remained there until twenty years old. He then entered the law office of Benjamin S. Robbins, and read law under his instruction for one year, soon returning to Smithfield College he resumed his legal studies in Louisville, Kentucky, until March, 1881, when he was admitted to the bar. In April of that year he came to Osceola. He was married December 24, 1881, to Miss Lily Bell High, of Louisville, Kentucky. SCOTT NESBIT was born in Mt. Jackson, Pennsylvania, November 25, 1846. He received a common school education, and like many American boys with that slight equipment started out to "paddle his own canoe" in the general race. He first entered business as a dealer in Canada pine lumber until a high protective duty being put on it virtually prohibited its importation. A few months later he entered the dry goods business at Edenburg, Pennsylvania, succeeding quite well until failing health compelled him to seek a different climate. In 1870 he removed to St. Clair County, Missouri, and opened a stock farm in Monegaw Township, continuing in that business until March, 1874. when he removed to Osceola, Missouri, to take the position of assistant cashier, a position he still occupies, in the St. Clair County Bank, of which he was one of the original incorporators. He is the third son of John C. and Harriett Nesbit, both of whom are still living in this county. The other brothers are Charles W. Nesbit, a farmer of St. Clair County, who is well known, as one of the most advanced breeders of thoroughbred stock in Southwest Missouri, and the Hon. Frank C. Nesbit, who represented St. Clair County in the Missouri Legislature in 1876, and was also the Hancock elector for his district in 1880, and has for two terms held the position of secretary of the Missouri Senate. Mr. Nesbit has a natural talent for the banking business, and is looked upon as one of the best financiers in the state. RILEY OVERTON, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Vego County, Indiana, in 1837. His father, Matthias Overton, was a native of Scotland, but left that country when he was ten years of age, coming to the United States and locating in Switzerland County, North Carolina. After residing there a few years he moved to Indiana. In 1822 he married Miss Nancy Whaley, of North Carolina, and to them were born eight children. When Riley was but four years old his lather died, and he continued to live with his mother until he was thirteen, then binding himself out to work until his seventeenth year. This contract expiring, he worked at different places for a time, and was then married to Miss Leona Wright Gunn, a daughter of John Gunn, of Vego County, Indiana. They have had three sons and three daughters: Mary E., Ella F., Edgar R., William R., Harriet C., and Arthur H., politically Mr. Overton is a Republican. He is one of the prominent farmers of this township; and now owns 319 acres of valuable land, under fence and well improved, upon which is a good vineyard, residence and outbuildings. JAMES B. OWEN, section 29, a representative citizen of this township, is the son of Josiah and Sarah Owen, nee Butcher, and was born in Gasconade County, Missouri, in 1833. His father was born in South Carolina in 1801, and in 1824 was married, his wife having come originally from Calhoun, Tennessee. They had twelve children, James being the fifth child. Previous to his birth the senior Owen had moved to Gasconade County, Missouri, but when nine years old the subject of this sketch, leaving that vicinity, went to Camden County in 1842, to Dade County in 1843, Hickory in 1848, Cooper in 1860, and finally settled in St. Clair County in 1869. In 1855 Mr. Owen was married in Hickory County to Lucy A. Dickinson, and they are the parents of eleven children: Marion J., William, Medford, Louisa C., James M., Mary S., Sarah M., Nancy R., Mattie D., Charlie J. and John F. Mr. O. is a leading member of the Democratic party, and has been a delegate to conventions at Osceola every year since in the county. He took an active part in the rebellion, and was engaged in forty-two battles, first serving as lieutenant and then as quartermaster general. He received three severe wounds, and had three horses shot from under him. His landed estate embraces 240 acres. JOHN R. PACE, a native of Pitt County, Virginia, was born in 1831. His father, Francis Pace, originally of Goochland County, Virginia, was born in 1798, and first married Miss Lucy Davis. His second marriage occurred in 1830, to Miss Maria Griggs, also of Virginia. By this union there were eight children, John R. being the eldest. In 1854 he was married to Miss Mary Burton, and they are the parents of three children: James F., William P. and Martha E. Mr. Pace came to this county in 1855, immediately after his marriage, and now owns 320 acres of valuable land. In his political preferences he is a Democrat. JOHN E. PAGE, section 10, was born October 17, 1844, in Livingston County, New York, and was a son of Albert and Abigal Page, both natives of the same state. John E. was reared upon a farm, receiving his education at the common schools and at the Nunda Academy. Coming west in 1866, he located first in Bates County, Missouri, where he resided about three years. He removed to St. Clair County in February, 1869, and came on his present farm in the fall of 1870. This consists of 300 acres, with 240 in his home place and sixty acres of timber. Mr. Page devotes some attention to stock feeding. He was married in this county in February, 1871, to Miss Virginia Corbly, a native of Iowa (where she was reared and educated), and a daughter of William Corbly. They have two children, Mary Octavia and Jessie M. GIDEON PAPE, dealer in general merchandise at Tiffin, is a native of Germany, and was born July 21, 1846. He was reared and educated in his native country, and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits till 1865, when he emigrated to America, landing at New York. After this he traveled until 1871, when, coming to St. Clair County, Missouri, he located on the Osage, where he followed the milling business until 1876. Then he began in his present business, in which he has been very successful, and he is now one of the leading business men of the county. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity. Mr. Pape was married October 2, 1873, to Miss Elizabeth M. Bogle, of Niagara County, New York. They have three children: Charlotta A., Stella A. and Edith E. JOHN B. PAYNE, of the firm of Payne & Son, proprietors of livery and feed stable, was born in Upshire County, West Virginia, November 2, 1856. He remained in the vicinity of his birthplace until ten years of age, when, with the family, he came to Henry County, Missouri. He was brought up there and received his education, living in that county until, with his father, he established his present business, in November, 1881. The building which they occupy is 140x30 feet, two stories in height and contains a good stock of horses, buggies, etc. Mr. Payne is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity, and is also a Good Templar. WILLIAM PAYNE, originally from Greene County, Tennessee, was born July 14, 1830, his parents being Eleazer and Elizabeth (Looney) Payne, both natives of Hawkins County, Tennessee, the former born in 1808, and the latter in 1809. Their marriage occurred in 1827, and to them were born ten children, of whom but two daughters and one son are living. Emigrating to St. Clair County, Missouri, in 1842, they remained there for three years, then returning to Tennessee. Mr. Payne died September 18, 1845, and his widow now resides with her only son, William, in this township. In 1855 our subject purchased 120 acres of land in Polk Township, this county, upon which he has since lived. November 12, 1848, he married Miss Mahala Suiter, also a Tennesseean by birth. They were the parents of six sons and five daughters, all of whom survive save one daughter. Mrs. Payne died in 1873. About four years thereafter Mr. P. married Mrs. Mary A., widow of John W. Ellis, of this county. They have had three children, two daughters and one son. Mrs. Payne has three daughters by her former marriage. Mr. P. is one of the most enterprising agriculturists in the township in which he resides. In politics he is a Greenbacker. Himself and wife are identified with the Methodist Protestant Church. BENJ. F. PEPPER, wagon maker, a native of Hampshire County, West Virginia, was born July 13, 1833, his parents being James and Catherine (Wise) Pepper, originally from Virginia. Benjamin F. was the eldest of a family of seven children. He was reared on his father's farm in Virginia and there obtained his education, remaining at home until 1857, when he emigrated to Hancock County, Illinois. There he followed farming for eighteen months. Going to Alton he was employed as salesman for J. D. Freeman for three years when he acted as a guard in the prison at that place for a number of years, after which he worked at carpentering and wagon making in different parts of Illinois until 1871. Then he came to St. Clair County, Missouri, and farmed two years, soon settling in Roscoe. He has since been occupied in the manufacture of wagons, etc., and also owns a farm of 180 acres. In December, 1858, Mr. Pepper, married Miss Sarah Johnson, a native of New Jersey. They have two children: Douglas L. and Florence. RICHARD W. PERRIN was born January 11, 1842, in Osceola, Missouri, his lather being Daniel Perrin, who came to this county in 1835 from Ohio. He was a stone and brick mason by trade and he made the first brick in this county. He settled on Brush Creek, east of the city, and married Jane Clarkston, of Cooper County. He died in 1879, his wife having preceded him in 1859. They had six sons: Richard W., James, Joseph N., Daniel (George W. died in 1881) and John Wesley. Mr. Perrin married for his second wife, Mrs. Sally Redman, and they had one son, Andrew Wesley. Richard W. learned the mason's trade in youth and worked at it more or less through life. In the spring of 1862 he enlisted in the Eleventh Missouri Cavalry, under Colonel William D. Woods. They were in Missouri, Texas, Arkansas and Tennessee and he took part in many hard fought battles and skirmishes. At the close of the war he returned home and in 1867, August 22, was married to Miss Nannie Bell. They have five children: Ann E., Jane, Charles W., James E. and Estella. Mr. Perrin has the contract for carrying mail from this city to Appleton and to Quincy and also to Humansville. JAMES CHRISTOPHER PHILLIPS, presiding judge of St. Clair County, was born in Simpson County, Kentucky, September 12, 1849, being the son of James Phillips, of Georgia. His mother, formerly Margaret F. Black, was a Kentuckian by birth. James Phillips had four children by his first marriage and six by the last. Of these the subject of this sketch is the third child. His mother died in 1879 while on a visit to this county. His father is still living in Kentucky at the advanced age of almost eighty-two years. James C. came to Missouri in 1872 and settled in Henry County, remaining there five years. He then removed to Appleton Township, this county, where he owns a farm of 240 acres on section 4. He is one of the progressive men of this county, keeping well apace with all the improvements of the day. With the exception of a small sum received from his father, he has been the architect of his own fortune. His education was obtained at the common schools yet he had an inquiring mind, and by reading and study has acquired such knowledge as has qualified him for important positions in life. He married Miss Mary L. Harris in 1869. She was the daughter of Eli R. Harris, of Simpson County, Kentucky. Her mother was Lucinda Bland, daughter of Milton Bland, of Kentucky. Mr. Phillips is a Democrat and belongs to the Christian Church. He was elected presiding judge of the county court in November, 1882. JOHN R. PICKERILL is a native of Ripley, Brown County, Ohio, was born July 26, 1843. He was brought up upon his father's farm and followed that occupation till the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in September, 1861, in Company M, Fifth Ohio Cavalry Regiment, serving three years and three months. After this he returned home and in February, 1865, came to Henry County, Missouri, where he engaged in farming. In 1870 he came to Appleton City, and embarked in the grocery business, continuing the same for two years. In January, 1871, he was appointed postmaster and held that position four years, being the first postmaster appointed at Appleton. In 1875 he established himself in the livery and stock business, the former of which he now continues. Mr. Pickerill was married in August, 1874, to Miss Allie McCorkle, a native of Indiana. His first marriage, however, occurred to Miss Hannah Rice, October 27, 1865. They had two children: George R., and Willie S. Mr. P. was mayor of Appleton City, from April, 1880, to April, 1882. JOHN W. PIERCE, farmer and insurance agent, section 22, was born in Washington County, New York, January 20, 1829, and was a son of Samuel and Emily (Whitney) Pierce, the former a native of New York and the latter of Vermont. When our subject was about seven years old his parents moved to Ohio, where he grew to manhood and received his education. At the age of nineteen he engaged in the patent right business, which he followed for two years, afterward becoming occupied in manufacturing linseed oil for three years. In 1848 he went to Illinois and farmed until 1859, after which he was again in the patent right business for four years. In 1867 he came to St. Clair County, Missouri, and now owns a farm of 160 acres, all well improved. He is also agent for some of the leading insurance companies, and H. H. Dix' marble works. Mr. P. is a member of the M. E. Church. In September, 1846, he married Miss Casinda Bird, a native of Pennsylvania. They have six children: William B., Maria C., Leander M., Harriett A., Julia D. and Baxter R. They lost three. J. H. PILES, farmer, section 10, a native of Hampshire County, West Virginia, was born August 27, 1832, and was a son of John and Elizabeth (Buckman) Piles, Virginians by birth. J. H. was reared on his father's farm in Virginia, and was educated in the common schools. He followed farming there until 1870, when he emigrated to Missouri and located in St. Clair County. Here he owns a farm of 310 acres, which will average with any in the township. He is also a large stock raiser, now having about 120 head of cattle. At the breaking out of the late war he was appointed captain of the 114th regiment, Virginia State Militia. In 1862 he enlisted in Stonewall Jackson's Brigade, and at the battle of Marion Hill he was wounded and afterwards was unable for infantry service. He was then made captain of Company K, Forty- seventh Virginia Cavalry, and served until the close of the war. He is a member of the M. E. Church, South. January 17, 1856, Mr. Piles was married to Miss Jane Robinson, of Virginia. They have ten children: William T., Mary E., Martha E., Dora A., John R., Rebecca S., Richard J., Robert Lee, Ida May and Estella. JOHN W. PLUMBLEE was born in White County, Tennessee, March 15, 1835, his father being William Plumblee, a Virginian by birth, born in August, 1800, who, while young, left that state and accompanied his father to Tennessee. In 1826, he was married there to Miss Sarah Lewellen, a daughter of Jacob Lewellen, of Tennessee. John W. was the fourth child in a family often children. When yet a small boy (three years old), he accompanied the family to Newton County, Missouri, but a short time afterwards removed to Berryville, Arkansas, at which time this place was made up of one house and a stable owned by the senior Plumblee. Leaving there in 1858, he emigrated to Texas, but in 1860, returned to Arkansas, where he was residing at the breaking out of the civil war. In 1862, Mr. P. entered the United States service as a volunteer in Company E, First Arkansas Cavalry Regiment, serving as such till June 30, 1863, when he was transferred to the Fourth Arkansas Cavalry Regiment, and mustered in as a lieutenant. He was discharged at the close of the war. In 1864, in accordance with a proclamation of President Lincoln, made to fill vacancies in the House of Representatives of the state of Arkansas, he was elected a representative and served until its adjournment in 1865. In 1863 his family had removed to Greene County, Missouri, and here he joined them in 1865, soon after locating on his present farm. In 1872 he was elected a judge of the county court of St. Clair, and subsequently served as collector of Collins Township for about three years. In 1855 he was married to Sarah B. Hayter, daughter of Thomas B. Hayter, of Carroll County, Arkansas. They have had ten children: Francis J., Elizabeth C., Mary C., William T. (died in 1869), John B., Martha A., Sarah M., Paulina E. (died in 1870), James M. and Anna M. Mr. Plumblee is now actively engaged in farming and stock raising and owns a fine farm of 210 acres in section 29. JOHN POLING was born in Randolph County, Virginia, September 8, 1816, his parents, John and Margaret Poling, nee Gainer, also being natives of the same county. The former, born in 1796, died while our subject was an infant, and the latter was born in 1799. Their marriage occurred in 1814. One year after the death of her husband, Mrs. Poling married Abner Schoonover, of the same county, and with him emigrated to Macon County, Missouri. They had nine children, and of these three daughters only are living. Mr. S. died March 1, 1862. He was a celebrated fifer, and was fife-major of the Eleventh regiment, Missouri State militia. His widow also died in 1862. John Poling, the only child in his father's family, was brought up by his stepfather, and was married to Miss Emily Palon, of Barbour County, Virginia. To them were born three children: Edith M., Arch E. and Luther G. Mrs. P. died August 9, 1874. He was afterwards married to Mrs. Sarah Bernard, widow of James Bernard, of St. Clair County, who has five children living, and all residents of this county. Mr. Poling now resides on section 9, of this township, where he owns 160 acres. He also owns a farm in the central portion of the township, upon which is a celebrated spring, known as the Poling Spring. He has been very successful in the cultivation and raising of wheat, and one year from three bushels of seed sown on less than three acres of land realized 105 bushels, an average of nearly thirty-five bushels per acre. He also raises considerable corn. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and politically is Democratic. WILLIAM H. POTTER, physician and surgeon at Tiffin, was born in Genesee County, New York, June 2, 1838, and is the son of John and Julia A. (Stillwell) Potter, natives of New York. When William H. was about nine years of age his parents, with the family, moved to Washington County, Wisconsin, where he grew to manhood, his time being spent on a farm and in a store. In the spring of 1860 he began the study of medicine with Dr. Hayes, of Boston. In the spring of 1861 he enlisted in Company K, Second Wisconsin Infantry, and in the fall of the same year the company was transferred and known as Company A., First Artillery. He remained in service three years, acting as hospital steward. After this he traveled till 1869 when he located in Saline County, Nebraska, there commencing the practice of medicine. He continued it till 1879 when he located in Bates County. In 1882 he came to Taberville, St. Clair County and in the fall of the same year, took up his residence at Tiffin. The doctor is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He was married October 11, 1868, to Miss Helen Hildreth, a native of Wisconsin. B. N. PRIER, farmer and stock raiser, section 24, a native of Edgar County, Illinois, was born April 25, 1840, and is a son of Edward H. and Narcissia (Lowry) Prier. The family early removed to Illinois, and were among the first settlers of Edgar County. In 1854, they located in Clark County, Iowa, coming thence to Missouri in 1870. B. N. Prier spent his youth on the home farm, and was married in Clark County, Iowa, in January, 1862, to Miss Agnes Landies, a daughter of Samuel Landies, and a native of Greene County, Indiana. They have four children : Maggie, (wife of William Frazee), Samuel E., Frank L., and Maud. After residing in Clark County about eleven years, Mr. P., in March, 1873, came to Missouri and located in St. Clair County. He now has 240 acres of land, with 200 acres in cultivation. In June, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, Eighteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and served till discharged in February, 1863. He participated in the fight at Springfield, Missouri, and a number of others. JAMES M. PUGH, circuit clerk and abstracter of titles, was born near Columbus, Ohio, September 2, 1845. His father was Andrew J. Pugh, who came to Missouri in 1857, and settled in St. Clair County. He served in the Mexican war and was wounded at Cerro Gordo, but remained through the war with the regiment of mounted rifles from Ohio. In 1861 he took sides with the Union and became commander of Freemont's Scouts and Guides. After the army under Freemont were disbanded, Mr. Pugh joined the Sixtieth Regiment of Enrolled Missouri Militia, in which he received the commission of major in 1862. He served until the close of the war. He was soon after appointed sheriff of St. Clair County by Governor Gamble, but immediately resigned in favor of Mr. Roberts In 1875, he moved to Cedar County where he now lives. Mrs. Pugh died in 1879. James M. received but limited advantages for acquiring an education, but by self application he fitted himself for a teacher, and for several terms was so occupied. He was later engaged in clerking in the county offices, and in 1870 was appointed deputy clerk, and assisted in the circuit clerk's duties until 1874, when he was elected circuit clerk. In 1879 he was re-elected and again in 1882. In 1879 he purchased a half interest of the Shields Brothers in their abstract books. In October, 1863 he joined the Second Kansas Cavalry, and was with General Steele in Arkansas for two years. Mr. Pugh married Miss Nannie Hicks, May 28, 1871. She was the daughter of J. L. Hicks. They have three children: Ruth, Addie and Bessie. Politically he is a Greenbacker. He belongs to the Christian Church, and is also a Mason, and a member of the I. O. O. F. J. A. PURINTON. The subject of this sketch is the leading merchant of Taberville, and among those prominent in St. Clair County. He carries a stock of goods equal to any firm in the county, and also has a store at Bain's Ferry. He is a son of John and Lois (Felch) Purinton, the former of Massachusetts and the latter of New Hampshire. J. A., the only child, was born in Meigs County, Ohio, August 20, 1825. At the age of five years he was left fatherless when he moved to Lynn, Massachusetts, making his home with his uncle. There he was educated in the academy. His uncle being a manufacturer and wholesale dealer in shoes, J. A. was employed in the factory and store until 1848 when he went to Athens, Ohio, where he was engaged in merchandising for two years. He then followed the same business in St. Paris, Ohio, until 1861, when he enlisted in Company A., Sixty-sixth Ohio, being mustered in October of the same year, and assigned to the commissary department in which he served until the close of the war. The most of the time he was quartermaster. Going to Indianapolis, Indiana, he became buyer and general manager for Spousler & McCrery, wholesale dealers in house furnishing goods and queensware, remaining with them for two years, when he located in Warrensburg, Missouri, engaging in the furniture business. After three years he purchased and entered large tracts of land in Vernon and St. Clair Counties, since which time he has been interested in the stock business. He has been occupied in the mercantile business at Taberville since 1876. Mr. P., during life has taken great interest in educational matters and is one of the men to whom Warrensburg is much indebted for having one of the finest schools of the state. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. P. was married November 3, 1850, to Miss Lusetta Culver, a native of Madison County, Ohio. They have seven children. John, Frank A., James H., Charles A., Lucius L., Asa and Ella. GEORGE Y. PYEATT, farmer and stock feeder, section 10, was born in Richland County, Ohio, on March 6, 1834. Jacob Pyeatt, his father, also a native of Ohio, was born in 1802, and his mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Stewart, came originally from Vermont. In 1838 the family removed to Illinois and were among the early settlers of Perry County. George Y. passed his youth on the farm in that county, and was married there February 14, 1856, to Miss Teresa Wells, a daughter of Lewis Wells, of the same locality. Mr. P. after his marriage was engaged in farming in Perry County about twenty-one years. In 1877 he came to Missouri and located in St. Clair County, moving on his present farm in 1880. He has 120 acres of land, all improved, and upon it feeds considerable stock for the market. Mr. and Mrs. Pyeatt have six children: Virgil W., Philena F., (wife of Cyrus H. Hinkle), Alverta E., (wife of Harley A. Hinkle), Alfred G., Sabra W., (wife of Edward J. Allenson) and Herschel S. Two are deceased, Emma F., died in 1874, at the age of fourteen years and Alice A. died in infancy. Mr. Pyeatt and his wife are members of the Christian Church. He belongs to the I. O. O. F. lodge at Osceola. ALONZO RAY, merchant, was born in Portage County, Ohio, May 10, 1823. His parents were John and Elmira (Root) Ray, the former a native of West Virginia, and the latter of Vermont. They reared six children, of whom Alonzo was the second child. He was brought up and educated in his native state, and in 1843 he went to Chicago, where he worked two years at the harness trade. He then located at Lafayette, Indiana, and was occupied at his chosen calling two years, and also at various places till 1849, when he emigrated to California. There he was interested in mining till 1851. Returning to Kansas, where he was engaged in farming till 1867. Then he came to Roscoe and has since been engaged in merchandising. He has held the office of justice of the peace for some years, and he was postmaster of this place for seven years. Mr. Ray has been three times married, first to Miss Fannie Eyemer, of New York, November 26, 1853. Her death occurred June 14, 1855. He was again married February 5, 1856, to Mrs. Caroline Kinyon, a daughter of James Lee. She died August 23, 1876. He was married to his present wife January 8, 1878, her name being Mrs. Mary L. Barr. He has two children by his second wife, Restory and Willis H. RANSOM M. RAYMOND, of the Appleton City Carriage Works, came originally from Orleans County, New York, where he was born April 30, 1838. When four years old he was taken by the family to Benton County, Missouri, where he was reared on his father's farm. In 1858 he moved to Quincy, Hickory County. In 1861 he enlisted in Company A, Eighth Missouri Cavalry, and served until discharged, January 25, 1865. Returning to Quincy, he worked at the blacksmith trade until 1868. when he went to Greenfield, Dade County, where he lived until 1876. Then he established his present business in Appleton City. Mr. Raymond was married June 1, 1865, to Miss Harriet B. J. Long, of Dade County, Missouri. They have six children: Lulu, Ottie, Helen, Frank, Alice and Robert. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. LOUIS M. REESE, dealer in lumber, etc., was born in Osceola, Missouri, in 1850, and was the son of Lewis M. Reese, originally from Tennessee. In 1866 Louis commenced working at the printing business, which he followed as compositor, and editor and publisher until 1881, having been connected with the Herald at Osceola, the Courier at Appleton City, and the Sun in Osceola. In the winter of 1881 he embarked in the lumber trade, and he is now doing a successful,business. He married Miss Emma J. Lewis in 1881, a daughter of Dr. L. Lewis, who was born in Virginia December 15, 1813. Dr. Lewis was a son of Howell Lewis and a grandson of Fielding Lewis, who married Bettie Washington, sister of George Washington. Dr. Lewis was a prominent physician. He came to Osceola in 1839, and for many years was county treasurer. Dr. Lewis died December 20, 1878. He was twice married, first to Mary Ferguson February 8, 1843. She died December 24, 1845. His second marriage occurred March 14, 1853, to Mary E. Reynolds. Politically Mr. R. is a Republican. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity. ALEXANDER M. RICE is a native of Sumner County, Tennessee, and was born July 30, 1845. His parents, William and Lena Rice, nee Cotton, were born in the same county, and they had a family of six daughters and four sons, of whom there are now living Henry S., Mary M., Sassandre Alice, and Alexander M. Rice. The latter was married in 1865 to Miss Ellen Hooper, daughter of Claybourne and Mary Hooper, of this county. They have had eight children, but only five survive: James A., Mary M., Anna, William E. and Estella. Mr. Rice commenced life for himself at the age of eighteen years, and in 1880 he purchased his first farm, of 100 acres, located on section 8 of this township, about eight or nine miles northeast of Osceola. Since that time he has been improving this place. He is very industrious and energetic, and is rapidly assuming a place among the enterprising agriculturists of the vicinity. His farm is well adapted for stock raising. Mr. Rice and his wife are identified with the M. E. Church, which meets at Sheldon's school house, this township. His political views are Democratic. N. L. RICKMAN is the son of Joshua Rickman, who was born in the state of Tennessee, August 9, 1801. He came to St. Clair County, Missouri, in 1840, and located in Chalk Level Township, where he was married to Miss Mary B. Terry in 1844. She was born in Tennessee November 4, 1819. Joshua Rickman died April 28, 1879. N. L. was born in St. Clair County, Missouri, January 21, 1850, and has since lived here. He learned the blacksmiths' trade with his father, which he followed till 1878, since which time he has been occupied in farming. The landed estate of the Rickman family consists of 240 acres. Mr. R. is considered to be one of the most respected citizens of Chalk Level and was township clerk one term. He is a member of the Christian Church. JOHN T. RIDGWAY, section 17, is a native of Howard County, Missouri, and was born January 11, 1838. his parents being Jesse and Anna (Wiley) Ridgway, Kentuckians by birth. The former came to Missouri in 1819 with his parents who were among the pioneer settlers of Howard County. Jesse Ridgway removed to St. Clair County, in 1840. John F. spent his youth on the farm in this county, and was married October 16, 1866, to Miss Ophelia Catherine Thompson, a daughter of John F. Thompson. She was born in this county and was here reared. She died June 2, 1875, leaving three children: Mattie Ann Lee, Robert F. and Ettie F. Mr. Ridgway was then married August 15, 1875, to Mrs. Ann Mains, widow of James Mains. She had two children by her former marriage: William T. and George H. Mains. There are three children by this latter union: James H. H., John Ed. and Mary Ann. Mr. R. now owns 240 acres of land, of which 150 are in good cultivation. He also owns 160 acres in another tract. In 1862 he enlisted in Company D., General Coffey's Regiment, Missouri State Guards, and served about six months, then re-enlisting in the regular Confederate service, under General Cockerel. He served three months in this regiment and was transferred to Young's Cavalry Battalion and served about one year. He participated in the fights of Prairie Grove, Arkansas, Springfield, Missouri, and others. He received a wound below the knee at Springfield and was disabled about two months. He was taken a prisoner at this time and held thirteen months, then escaping. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. THOMAS ROBERTS was born in Rutherford County, Tennessee, in 1841, and was the son of Jesse Roberts, originally of South Carolina, born in 1778. About the year 1798 he was married, but his wife subsequently dying, he removed to Tennessee, where In 1833 (or thereabouts) he married for his second wife Miss Rachel McChristian, a Tennesseean by birth. They had seven children, of whom our subject was the fifth child. Four years after the birth of Thomas his father, leaving Rutherford County, emigrated to Kentucky, and four years later, or in 1849, came to Missouri and settled in Benton County, about ten miles above Warsaw on the Osage River. In the spring of 1854 he brought his family to St. Clair County, locating at Tyler's Bend. A few years later he died, leaving the family in straightened circumstances. His widow dying soon afterwards, the care and support of the family fell upon Thomas and his brother Joseph. They were equal to the emergency, however, and being possessed of an indomitable will and energy, succeeded admirably in their undertaking. After encountering many obstacles and privations brought about by the late civil war they now own 250 acres of as valuable rolling land as is in the county, it being located in section 13. On September 6, 1866, Thomas Roberts was married to Miss Martha I. Graham, and they have two sons and three daughters: William, Mary E., Lucy Belle, Marian F. and Emily Lucretia. Joseph Roberts was born February 15, 1842, in Rutherford County Tennessee, and also accompanied his father to this county. The education of these brothers has been obtained entirely through their own efforts and by the light of the fire at night, no one having taught them even the alphabet. They are both identified with the Greenback movement and are numbered among the prominent citizens of this county. ABRAM W. ROBINSON, was born in Peoria County, Illinois, October, 18, 1841. His father, William Robinson, was born in Jefferson County, Virginia, November 27, 1805. He came to Peoria County, Illinois, in 1827, and remained there until his death, which occurred at his home in Medina Township, September 14, 1881. He was married in 1833 to Catharine Wiedman who was born in Champaign County, Ohio. They had a family of six children, four sons and two daughters. The subject of this sketch was the third son and was brought tip on his father's farm, receiving his education at the common schools during the winter. He lost his mother at the age of eight years. With the outburst of the civil strife in 1861, he responded to the nation's call for troops and enlisted in the three months' service, returning at the expiration of that time. For several years after that be was employed by the government in buying cattle and shipping them to the armies in the South, until ill health obliged him to discontinue the business. After the war he spent about a year in St. Louis and in traveling. He then returned to Macoupin County, Illinois, and worked as a farm hand. He then rented a farm for awhile, and in October, 1871, with what he had accumulated, he came to St. Clair County and bought 160 acres in section 15. The 14th day of January, 1872, he commenced its improvement, and by hard labor, toiling in a way utterly detrimental to his health, earned and built up a home. October 22, 1873, he married Miss Cora H. Clark, who was born in DuPage County, Illinois, October 9, 1848. Her father, David H. Clark, was struck dead by lightning March 17, 1850. (Mr. Robinson's mother died the next day, the 18th of March, 1850). He was born in Ohio and was one of the first settlers in Illinois. He married Mary Jarvis, who was born in New York. Her parents were among the first settlers in Illinois and her father built the first frame house in Chicago. She died in St. Clair County, Missouri, May 2, 1872. Mr. Robinson bought in 1875, 160 acres of land in section 23. In 1878 he purchased eighty acres more, and in 1879, five acres in section 1, also owning forty acres in section 16. He was a great worker and a warm friend to the poor and those in need of assistance. He was the father of three children: Frank C., born April 19, 1875; Roy D., born June 25, 1876, and Harry E., born July 13, 1879. The summer of 1881 he bought a steam threshing machine and went with that part of the summer and fall. November, 5 he was injured by slipping from the step of a wagon box and this terminated in pneumonia fever. He died December 1, 1881. He was a member of the A. F. & A. M. fraternity for twelve years and his burial was conducted by them the following Sunday. A large concourse of friends followed him to his last resting place - the Appleton cemetery. WILLIAM T. ROBINSON, postmaster and merchant at Chalk Level, was born in Lawrence County, Illinois, October 1, 1839. His parents were Alexander and Mary A. (Gibbon) Robinson, both natives of Kentucky. W. T. was reared in the county of his birth, and in 1855 came to St. Clair County, Missouri, where he followed farming till 1881. Then he began his present business, in which he has met with good success. He was married January 3, 1868, to Miss Elsie J. Landon. They have one child, Edmond Landon, and have lost two: Ida and Eddie. Mr. and Mrs. R. are active members of the Christian Church. BUCKNER RUSSELL, farmer and stock dealer, section 21, was born in Moniteau County, Missouri, May 13, 1837. His father, John Russell, was a native of Kentucky, and married Miss Nancy Alley, of the same state. They had nine children, the subject of this sketch being the fourth child. He was reared to manhood in his native county, and was there educated, also following farming in the locality till 1866, when he came to St. Clair County, Missouri. His landed estate consists of 600 acres. During the war the greater part of his time was occupied in the Confederate service. Mr. R. is a member of the Masonic fraternity. November 8, 1866, he was married to Miss Matilda Harriman, of Illinois. By this union they have four children: John W., Geneva, Elsie G. and Myrtie. EDWARD D. SAYLES, farmer and stock raiser, section 12, was born in Summit County, Ohio, August 8, 1856. His father, Dr. Dwight Sayles, married Miss Estella Wright, and they were also both natives of Ohio. The former died July 24, 1862. Edward D. was raised a farmer and received a good education at the common schools and the Talmage High School. After completing his studies he was foreman in a fire brick establishment for one year. In 1871 he came to Missouri and purchased the land where he now resides. After living there one summer he returned to Ohio. In 1876 he came back to his farm in St. Clair County. He went to Colorado in the spring of 1880 and spent the summer, returning to his farm in the fall. He has eighty acres of good land, and is devoting some attention to the breeding and raising of fine stock. He has a flock of 120 graded Cotswold sheep and a herd of eight head of thoroughbred shorthorn cattle. Mr. Sayles was married February 23, 1882, to Miss Barbara Warner, a daughter of Abraham Warner. She is a native of and was reared and educated in Washtenaw County, Michigan. J. B. SCOTT, farmer, section 7, was born in Bucyrus, Ohio, June 26, 1849, being a son of T. W. and Susan (Kintner) Scott. The former was born in Pennsylvania, and the latter in Indiana. T. W. Scott early went to Ohio with his parents, who were among the first settlers of Richland and Crawford Counties. He removed to DeKalb County, Indiana, in 1861, where the subject of this sketch grew to manhood. He was educated in the common and higher schools, and after completing his studies was engaged in teaching and taught for six years in the public schools of Michigan and Indiana. He has made the study of phrenology a specialty, and delivers an able lecture on this subject. Mr. Scott was married in DeKalb County, November 5, 1874, to Miss Emeline A. Clark, a daughter of O. C. Clark. She died in 1877. He was again married in DeKalb County, December 30, 1880, to Miss Minnie Wagner, a daughter of Jacob Wagner. She is a native of Michigan but was reared and educated in DeKalb County. Mr. Scott came to Missouri in the spring of 1882, and located on land which he had previously purchased in this county. He has 160 acres, but at present resides on a tract of eighty acres belonging to his father, which he is farming. JOHN SEEVERS, physician and surgeon, was born in Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa, in 1843, his father being Alfred Seevers, a native of Coshocton County, Ohio, he having emigrated to Iowa in 1840. He was largely and most successfully engaged in the nursery and fruit business, and in an early day supplied trees for many adjoining counties. His fine collection of fruit at the Centennial was admired by many. The maiden name of John's mother was Maria Bryan, of Pennsylvania. His grandfather Seevers served through the war of 1812 and his grandfather Bryan came originally from Ireland. His father is a near relative of Judge Seevers, of the supreme court of Iowa. Having determined when a boy to be a physician, John bent all his energies in that direction. In 1862 he went to Colorado and spent two years. On his return in 1864 he commenced the study of medicine. In 1865 he attended a course of lectures at the Medical College at Keokuk, Iowa, where he graduated in 1876. His professional education was acquired by his own efforts, and he is deserving the success that has attended his career here. He came to Osceola in 1881. Dr. Seevers married Miss Fidelia E. Freeborn in 1868. She was the daughter of Joseph Freeborn, of Winterset, Iowa, formerly from Ohio. They have four children: Iowa, Grace, Nellie and Roxy. The doctor is a prominent member and elder in the Presbyterian Church. He is a Mason and also belongs to the I. O. O. F. He has been a member of the city council and takes an active part in the improvements of the city. WADE W. SHAFFNER, attorney, was born in Harrison County, Virginia, September 11, 1848. He attended in youth the common schools, though the greater part of his education was obtained at home. In 1859 the family moved to Pennsylvania, and in 1861 they went to Sangamon County, Illinois. In 1869 Wade Shaffner came to Missouri, settling on a farm and divided his time between teaching school in winter and working on a farm in summer with his father. In 1874, he became editor of the Farmers' Friend, a paper published in Osceola in the interests of agriculture. He continued teaching until March 9, 1878, when he entered the law office of the late John C. Ferguson, where, under his instruction, he was prepared for admission to the bar, September 11, 1879, before Judge John D. Parkinson. Mr. Shaffner married Miss Josephine O. Clevenger January 1, 1880. She is the daughter of the late George Clevenger. They have lost one child Gertrude. Politically Mr. Shaffner is a Democrat. He belongs to the Presbyterian Church and is a Mason. Isaac Shaffner, father of Wade W., is a farmer by occupation, and now lives in Chalk Level Township. He was born in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, June 17, 1823, and was the son of Frederick Shaffner. His mother was formerly Catharine Dihler, who died in 1860. Isaac, the third of eleven children, early went to Virginia, residing there until 1855. He then came to Illinois and remained until 1868, when he moved to this county and settled where he now lives. He married Melvina Leach, December 9, 1847. in Fauquier County, Virginia. She is the daughter of Thornton K. Leach, of Virginia, a soldier in the war of 1812. They have four children: Wade W., Mary A. (now Mrs. John Warner), Jacob M. and Luther L. Politically he is a Democrat and his religious preferences Presbyterian. ROBERT D. SHEEKS was born in Obion County, Tennessee, in 1830, and was the son of Jesse Sheeks, a Kentuckian, by birth, who after his marriage in that state, removed to Tennessee. After his death his widow married again, and in 1845 Robert D. accompanied his stepfather to St. Clair County, Missouri. He was married in 1858 to Miss Nancy Deshazo, of Collins Township, this county, and a daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Deshazo. They have eight children: Rufus P., Martha J., William R., Cornelius, Benjamin F., Mary E., Lucy and Cora. Mr. Sheeks is the owner of a good farm of 415 acres. ALBERT B. SHELDON was born December 27, 1816, near Hartford, Connecticut, his parents being Pardon and Nancy Sheldon, nee Mann, both of whom were born near Providence, Rhode Island, in the year 1780. They had three sons and three daughters. Pardon died June 18, 1822, in Connecticut, and his widow departed this life in 1836 in Rhode Island. In 1837, leaving the state of his birth, Albert B. Sheldon went to St. Louis, Missouri, and was occupied for a time in traveling through Missouri, Illinois, Arkansas and the Cherokee Nation in the interest of a clock business. Subsequently, with Nicholas Campbell, he purchased a stock of general merchandise and took it as far as Boonville, then going in search of a suitable location. Upon reaching Fairfield, in Benton County, they opened up a business in a log structure erected for the purpose on August 20, 1837. In December of that year Mr. S. received an appointment as postmaster. He continued this trade for three years, and on December 25, 1839, Miss Eliza Gardner, of St. Clair County, who was born September 10, 1822, in Marion County, Missouri, became his wife. Her father, James Gardner, was among the oldest pioneers of this county. He was originally from Georgia, but emigrated to Tennessee in an early day, going thence to Marion County, Missouri, and later to this county in 1833, before it was organized. He, together with Crow and Crutchfield, located the town of Osceola, erecting the first store above the government trading post, conducted by Bishop and Hogle. Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon have had nine children, six sons and three daughters, of whom there are living: William P., married a Miss Seaby, of Osceola; Luther W., married Anna White, of Monroe City; Thomas J., born September 15, 1853, and Marietta, born December 15, 1855, (wife of Dr. Nathaniel Wright, of this county. After his marriage Mr. S. purchased eighty acres of land on King's Prairie, but eight years later sold it and bought 120 acres in Polk Township. He has since then been a large land owner, but now has only 160 acres, upon which he resides. He and his wife have been members of the Christian Church for thirty-five years. His political views are Democratic and he has served as magistrate in this township. LUTHER W. SHELDON was born January 23, 1845, in St. Clair County, Missouri, and was the son of Albert B. and Eliza (Gardner) Sheldon, who had been married December 25, 1839. The former was born near Hartford, Connecticut, December 27, 1816, and the latter was born December 10, 1822, and of the original family of nine chidden - six sons and three daughters - four children survive: William P., Thomas J., Marietta and Luther W. The last named son married Miss Anna E. White, of Marion County, Missouri and they have had five children. William Albert, born September 9, 1871; Shelby W., born January 9, 1873; Bessie and Byron (twins), born September 2, 1877, (both died in early infancy); and Hattie May, born May 14, 1879. In 1868 Mr. Sheldon purchased seventy-five acres of land on section 8, of this township, and subsequently bought eighty acres adjoining. He has since been actively engaged in farming and stock raising and is one of the model farmers of Polk Township. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity at Osceola and is also connected with the M. E. Church, South, while his wife belongs to the Missionary Baptist Church, at Osceola. Politically he is a Democrat. WILLIAM E. SHELTON, M.D. was born in Spartanburg District, South Carolina, August 5, 1838. His father, Michael Shelton, was a native of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, but was reared in South Carolina. His mother, Delila (Keller) Shelton, was born in South Carolina. Their family consisted of six children, our subject being, the youngest. In 1845 they removed to Lexington, Missouri, where Mrs. S. died in 1857, and Mr. S. in 1863. In 1858 William removed to Warrenton, Warren County, Missouri, and the fall following (1859) began the study of medicine under Dr. C. D. Strother, with whom he remained as a student until 1861. In. 1861-2 he attended the St. Louis Medical College. In March, 1863, he enlisted in Company D, First Mississippi Regiment, Light Artillery, C. S. A., and was taken prisoner in the rear of Vicksburg, and held at Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Indiana, till February, 1865. The succeeding three months he spent in Mississippi. About June, 1865, he returned to Warren County, Missouri, and October 10, 1865, came to St. Clair County, and was actively engaged in the practice of medicine near Johnson City till 1870. In that year he went to Papinville, Bates County, Missouri, and devoted his attention to his profession for three months. Going back to Johnson City he resided there till October, 1872, when he came to Appleton City. Since his arrival here he has been a prominent practitioner. During the term of 1881-2 he attended the Bellevue Hospital Medical College of New York, and graduated from that institution at the expiration of that term. He is a member of the Masonic order and has attained to the Templar degrees. He also belongs to the I. O. O. F., and is a prominent member of the Good Templars. Dr. Shelton was mayor of this city in 1873-4-5, and has been chairman of the school board for the past eight years. He was united in marriage in April, 1866, to Miss Elizabeth Dodgson, a native of this county. They have three children, Mitchell C., John D. and Theodocia H. WESLEY G. SHEPHERD, was born in Wells County, Indiana, December 29, 1853, his father being Thomas Shepherd, originally from Ross County, Ohio, who was one of the first to settle in Bluffton, the county seat, he building the first house in the city. In 1857 he went to Navoo, Illinois, remained for two years, and then came with a colony to Henry County. In 1874 they moved to this county and settled one mile from Osceola, on the old Cox farm. Wesley's mother was formerly Clarissa Gracey, of Ross County, Ohio. They have two children living: W. G. and Ellen. In 1870, Wesley went to the Indian Territory, and was one of the parties driven out by the order of the government, losing everything he had. He returned home and made a new start. He was then engaged in various occupations in different localities. In 1879 he opened a restaurant, which has since grown into an hotel, and he is doing a successful business. He has held the office of city marshal. He married Miss C. Lyon, November 8, 1880. She was a daughter of Samuel Lyon. Her grandfather, Thomas Sheppard served in the Federal army, and he was the guide of the first company of United States soldiers in Henry County. CHRISTOPHER SHOE, proprietor of the Appleton City Mills, came originally from Germany, where he was born July 23, 1831. When he was two and a half years old the family emigrated to America, locating in Richland County, Ohio, which was their home for six years. Moving thence to Rock Island County, Illinois, they lived there one year, and then farmed in Scott County, Iowa, until 1849. For five years they gave their attention to saw milling and after this farmed and operated a saw mill alternately each for three years. Going to Union County of the same state, Mr. Shoe ran a saw mill and carding factory, which was destroyed by fire. As a result he erected a large grist and saw mill, conducting it for five years. In 1869 he came to St. Clair County and engaged in farming. In September, 1877, he erected his present large mills. He is also a prominent farmer of the county, owning one of the finest farms in this section. Mr. Shoe was married September 22, 1847, to Miss Nancy Forgey, a native of Indiana. They have nine children Margaret, David, Esther, Mary, John W., Christopher L., Sarah E., William E., and Nancy L. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. In 1873, he was one of the county commissioners. GEORGE W. SHORT, a native of Kentucky, was born June 18, 1811, his parents being George and Catharine (Monical) Short. George W. was the second son of six sons and five daughters. In 1813 the family removed to Indiana and located in Washington County, where they were among the pioneer settlers. Our subject grew to manhood in Washington County, and was married October 13, 1831, to Easter Carleton, of that county. There were nine children by this marriage: Elizabeth (deceased), Nancy C., William L., Hannah (wife of C. Minns), George F. (deceased), Samuel R., Margaret (wife of John Lewellen, Easter Ann (deceased) and David W. Mrs. Short died in the fall of 1862. Mr. S was married in Putnam County, Indiana, January 24, 1865, to Mrs. Cynthia Ann Hines, a widow of John Hines and a daughter of Thomas Read. She was a Kentuckian by birth. She has one son by her former marriage, Franklin Hines. There are two children by this last union, General Alonzo Sherman and Ama Cynthia. Mr. Short removed from Indiana to Missouri in 1839 and first located in Howard County, but in the fall of 1840 came to this county and settled on his present farm. He now owns 235 acres of land, but has owned 800 acres, of which he has given the larger portion to his children. He enlisted in March, 1862, in Company E of the Seventh Missouri Cavalry and served till discharged in the spring of 1863. After this he returned home, and re-enlisted and served in the Home Guards until the close of tile war. Mr. and Mrs. Short are members of the M. E. Church. JOHN W. SHOUP, farmer, section 30, is a son of Reason Shoup, a native of Adams County, Ohio, his parents having come originally from Pennsylvania. The mother of John W., whose maiden name was Elizabeth Foster, was also born in Adams County, Ohio. Her parents were Virginians by birth. The subject of this sketch, the third child in a family of six children, was born in Adams County, Ohio, August 9, 1839. When he was six years old his parents moved to Lee County, Iowa, where he grew to manhood, spending his boyhood days on a farm. He has made farming his occupation during life. August 20, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Thirteenth United States Infantry, and remained in service three years, participating in many important battles, among which were Chickasau, Bayou, Arkansas Post, sieges of Jackson and Vicksburg, and others. After being mustered out he went to Putnam County, Missouri, where he was married to Miss Mollie E. Price, after which he resided in Putnam County till 1870. Then he came to his present location, where he has a farm of 110 acres. Mrs. S. was born in Jefferson County, Iowa, May 16, 1844. She was a daughter of Joseph and Mary A. (Puffenbarger) Price, who were natives of Ohio. The family of Mr. and Mrs. S. have numbered eight children, six of whom are living: Ostella F., Cora L., George T., Effie A., James M. and Fannie A. JOHN R. SINK is a native of Wilmington, Delaware, and was born in 1826. John Sink, his father, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1800, was married on the 14th day of July, 1822, to Miss Sallie A. Peterson, of Wilmington, and by this union there were three children, of whom John R. was the youngest. He accompanied his father to Kentucky while young, and lived there until seventeen years of age, when he emigrated to Green County, Illinois, living there until 1880. Then he came to St. Clair County, Missouri, and has here gained for himself an enviable reputation as a progressive agriculturist and citizen. In 1848 he married Miss Mary M. Story, a daughter of Vincent Story, Esq., and a resident of Morgan County, Illinois. They have had a family of twelve children: John Vincent, George W., James J., Lydia A., Sallie J., Mary J., Nancy H., Charles M., Martha E., Harry A., Ida E. and Eugene. Two of these are deceased. Mr. S. first came to this county during the fall of 1873, purchasing the land which he now occupies, consisting of 288 acres. Politically he is a Democrat. He is master of the Grange at Mitchell, Greene County, Illinois. ISAAC SLUDER, farmer and stock raiser, section 4, was born in Hendricks County, Indiana, August 30, 1839. His father, Henry Sluder, was a native of the same state, and his mother, whose maiden name was Nancy Lockhart, came originally from West Virginia. The family early removed to Owen County, and from there to Washington and then to Sullivan County, where Henry Sluder died in 1864. Isaac grew to maturity in Indiana, and after removing to Sullivan County he learned the shoemakers trade, working at the business about twenty years. He was married in Sullivan County April 20, 1859, to Miss Nancy Chestnut, a daughter of James Chestnut. They had four children: Martha E., (wife of Walter Kennett), Mary F., (wife of Martin Anderson), Ollie O. and Emma. Mrs. Sluder died in St. Clair County February 16, 1881. Mr. S. was married in this county June 2, 1881, to Mrs. Eliza Parker, widow of Elias Parker. She was born in Ohio, but moved west after her marriage and settled in St. Clair County. She has three children by her first husband, Estella Ann, Frank C. and Alice J. Parker. Mr. and Mrs. Sluder have one child, John Edward. Mr. S. removed to Missouri in 1880, settling on the farm where he now resides in 1881. There are 400 acres of excellent land in his place. J. O. SMITH, farmer, section 5. The subject of this sketch was born in Crawford County, Illinois, October 15, 1836. He is a son of James W. and Elizabeth (Watts) Smith, the former originally from Kentucky, and the latter of Illinois. When J. O. was two years old, his father moved to Wayne County, Kentucky, his mother having died in Illinois. Mr. Smith was reared in Wayne County and received an academic education. In 1860, he went to Wayne County, Iowa, and in 1862, to Putnam County, Missouri, where he resided till 1867. Since that time he has been a citizen of St. Clair County. He has followed farming during life and now has a farm of ninety acres. Mr. S. was married in September, 1858, to Miss Sarah A. Huffaker, a native of Wayne County, Kentucky. By this union they have eight children: Henry S., James J., Maggie A., Rosa B., William, Charles R., Walter and Lulu E. JOHN S. SMITH, editor of The Voice of the People, is a native of Jay County, Indiana, and was born March 13, 1848. His father, Aaron Smith was born in Ohio and his grandfather, Martin Smith, was a Virginian by birth. The mother of John S. was Mary Dillman, of Randolph County, Indiana, she being a daughter of William Dillman, whose father was robbed and murdered for his money in Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1852. The subject of this sketch is the oldest of eight children. His father removed to Dallas County, Iowa, while he was young, and there he was reared, improving his limited facilities for acquiring an education until he was qualified for teaching school. In 1864 he enlisted in the Forty-sixth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and after some months spent in the service he was discharged on account of disability. After his return he attended school for a time, and in 1867 went to St. Clair County, Missouri, and taught one term of school. He then returned to Iowa, and the succeeding ten years he was engaged in teaching, and succeeded in winning an enviable reputation as a painstaking, competent and faithful instructor. In 1877 he returned to St. Clair County and took charge of a school at Johnson City. In 1879 he took charge of The Voice of the People, and conducted it for the company owning it until 1882, when he purchased it, and he has since associated Dr. A. C. Marquis with him, and they are publishing one of the most readable papers in Southwest Missouri. In 1881, in the interest of the Greenback and Reform party, Mr. Smith was elected county school commissioner, an office he has proved himself amply qualified to fill. He was married October 21, 1881, to Miss Annie B. Nalley, a daughter of William Nalley, of this county, originally from Pike County, Missouri. They have one son, Clyde S., born September 1, 1882. THEODORIC SNUFFER, deceased, a pioneer in southwest Missouri, was born in Henry County, Virginia, July 15, 1799, and traces his paternal ancestry to Germany, his grandfather, Jacob Snuffer, and his wife, Sally, having emigrated to the United States in 1760. He served as a soldier in the revolutionary war, and participated in the battle of Brandywine Station. After the close of the war he settled on a farm east of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia, where he spent his remaining days, attaining the remarkable age of 110 years. He left a large family widely scattered, and among those remaining in Virginia was George, the father of the subject of this sketch, who was born in Virginia and in 1797 married Miss P. Janiet, of Virginia. By this union there were four sons and six daughters. Mr. Snuffer died in the service of his country in the war of 1812. Theodoric Snuffer was married in 1834 to Miss Margaret Baker, a native of Montgomery County, Virginia, and a daughter of Colonel Josiah Baker, an officer in the war of 1776. He married Miss Sallie Patton in 1793. In 1836 Mr. Snuffer came to Missouri and settled in Henry County near the present site of Calhoun, living in this county until the spring of 1838, when he removed to what is now St. Clair County, on the Osage River. His first building was a cabin ten feet square, and in this building he resided until July, 1839. Then he built, with the assistance of neighbors, a log house eighteen feet square. This building still remains on the old homestead. Mr. S. was, at this time, in the prime of vigorous manhood. He commenced farming by clearing and planting a few acres in Indian corn, and each year clearing and breaking a few more acres. Mr. and Mrs. Snuffer had five sons and one daughter born to them. Of these the daughter died in infancy, the third son died when four years of age; Cyrus R., the fourth son, was murdered in the Choctaw Nation by a band of outlaws, the leader of which was afterward hanged in Texas; Josiah, the eldest son, died in 1863 at Little Rock, Arkansas, while a soldier under General Price. Owen M. was an officer in the confederate army, and now resides on the old homestead. He was born on the 14th day of February, 1837, in Henry County, Missouri. In 1864 he married Mrs. Susan Tunstall, widow of Captain E. B. Tunstall, who fell at the battle of Elk Horn, in Arkansas, under General Price. By this union there are now living two daughters, Sallie and Esie. Mrs. Snuffer died in Arkansas in 1876. Mr. Owen Snuffer, to whom we are indebted for this sketch, has written several articles for the press, and among these contributions are "The Early Settlers of the County" and "The Sacking and Burning of Osceola by Jim Lane." "The Battle of Lone Jack," written by him, is acknowledged to be a fair and impartial history. He also assisted A. C. Appler in writing the only true life ever written of the Younger Brothers. DAVID SNYDER, farmer, section 16, came originally from Darke County, Ohio, where he was born in 1845. His parents, Pearson and Susan (Hidley) Snyder, moved to St. Clair County, Missouri, in 1857, where David was reared and educated. He now owns a fine farm, which contains 165 acres, and it is a good stock farm. He was married in 1867 to Miss Milliard Woolry, a native of Missouri. They have three children living: Pearson, Charley and John. H. H. SNYDER, farmer, section 28, was born in Darke County, Ohio, November 6, 1842. His father, Pearson Snyder, a native of New Jersey, died in this county March 13, 1862. The maiden name of the mother of our subject was Susan Hidley, originally from Ohio. She died in November, 1850. H. H. came to St. Clair County with his parents in 1857. He received his education in the schools of Ohio and Missouri. He has followed farming in this county since his arrival at manhood. In March, 1863, he enlisted in Company B, Eleventh Missouri Cavalry, and was discharged August 11, 1865. Mr. S. held the office of township constable six years. September 6, 1866, he married Miss Hannah J. McKinsley, a native of Kentucky. They have four children: Ida B., James W., Effie M., Elizabeth T. They lost one son, David E. JAMES P. SNYDER, farmer and stock raiser, section 17, is a native of Ohio and was born in Darke County, May 28, 1847, being the son of Pearson and Susan Snyder, nee Hidley, natives of New Jersey and Ohio respectively. James P. was the third of a family of six children. When ten years old his parents came to St. Clair County, Missouri, where he was brought up, attending for a time the common schools. He owns a farm of 300 acres, most of which is under fence and well improved. May 9, 1867, Mr. S. married Miss Frances Bunch, of this county. They have two children, Birdie A. and Arvel. JAMES R. STILES was born in Johnson County, Missouri, in 1847, and was the son of Dennis Stiles, a Kentuckian by birth, born in 1818, who, in 1838, emigrated to Johnson County, being one of the first settlers there. He was married twice, the second time in 1845, to Miss Tamson Bazzill, daughter of Ezekiel Bazzill. They had seven children, four sons and three daughters, James being the eldest child. In 1866 the senior Stiles leaving Johnson County, came to St. Clair County. A few years later, or in August, 1870, James R. was united in marriage with Miss Mary M. Jackson. They had five children, four of whom are living: James Henry, Lizzie S., Clara B. and Rolla J. The eldest son, Johnny Lewis, died August 18, 1881. Mr. Stiles is the owner of a farm of 100 acres, located in section 7. He is much interested in stock matters and gives considerable attention to fine stock, having some excellent animals. Formerly he was politically a Democrat, but later began to be found in the ranks of the Greenback party. He is a member of the Baptist Church at Macedonia and also belongs to the Grange, Concord lodge. Mr. S.'s mother, a native of Virginia, born in 1807, is now living and in the enjoyment of good health. WILLIAM B. STOUT, of the firm of Stout & Co., is a native of Harrison County, West Virginia, and was born July 3, 1854. His father, also originally of that state, was born November 4, 1818. His mother, whose maiden name was Amanda Blake, was born in West Virginia August 5, 1816. They had eight children, William being the sixth child. His father died September 24, 1876. He resided in the county of his birth until sixteen years old, when the family came to St. Clair County, Missouri, and here he farmed for three years. Then he engaged in school teaching, which he continued until April, 1881, when he embarked in his present business. He is a member of the Baptist Church. HON. M. B. STRICKLAND. Among the prominent men of St. Clair County is the subject of this sketch, who was born in Franklin County, Missouri, August 8, 1835. His father, E. B. Strickland, was a native of Georgia, and his mother, formerly Sarah K. Caldwell, was a Kentuckian by birth. E. B. Strickland was one of the early settlers and leading men of Franklin County. M. B. grew to manhood at his birth place on a farm, receiving a good common school education. He was married in St. Louis County, May 5, 1857, to Miss Mary Conway, a daughter of Samuel Conway. She is a native of St. Louis County. After this event Mr. S. resided in Franklin County until 1877, and in March of that year came to St. Clair County and purchased the farm where he now resides. He has 480 acres, improved, and makes a business of raising and feeding cattle, fattening annually about two car loads of steers. He takes a prominent part in the political issues of the day, and was nominated and elected to represent his county in the legislature at the general election of 1882. This position he filled with honorable distinction. Mr. and Mrs. Strickland have a family of five children: Virgil C., Mary, Virginia S., Ada L. and James L. Himself, wife and oldest daughter are members of the Presbyterian Church. SAMUEL C. STURTEVANT, a descendant of the old Puritan stock, traces his lineage back to the Allerton family, who were on board the Mayflower, and also to the Cushmans, who, as the agents of the Pilgrims in England, chartered the vessel for the first voyage. Samuel's father, Carleton Sturtevant, was a native of Litchfield County, Connecticut, and in 1823 emigrated to Ruggles, then of Huron, now of Ashland County, Ohio. Our subject was born on July 24, 1838. His primary education was received in the common schools, but this he supplemented with an attendance at Huron Institute, Milan, Ohio. In October, 1860, he married Adelaide E. Taylor, a most estimable lady. Emigrating to Bates County, Missouri, Mr. S. settled in Deepwater Township in the winter of 1867-68, and devoted his attention to farming and school teaching. He was a prominent citizen of that county until the summer of 1882, when he removed to Appleton City, St. Clair County. He has five children: Carleton W. (now in the class of civil engineers at the State University, Columbia, Missouri), Cora Allerton, Marion Cushman, Adelaide E. and Winfield E. RUDOLPH SUTMILLER, a member of the extensive establishment of Sutmiller & Co., dealers in hardware, stoves, tinware, furniture, etc., is a native of Hanover, Germany, and was born July 20, 1840. He was reared in that country, and when fourteen years of age was apprenticed to the cabinet maker's trade, at which he served a term of four years. Emigrating to America, he landed at New Orleans, and there worked six weeks, when he went to St. Louis, Missouri. He followed his trade in that city and vicinity till June, 1862, then enlisting in the United States army, and serving one year. He soon came to Warren County, Missouri, and was engaged in contracting and building six years. He made his home in Clinton for eighteen months, after which he came to Appleton City and continued contracting and building, and erected many of the best buildings in the city. In April, 1877, he with his present partner, R. L. Booth, embarked in the hardware business at Schell City, Missouri, where they had a good trade till 1880. They then removed their business to Appleton City, and now carry a large stock in this line, and are enjoying a lucrative patronage. Mr. Sutmiller was married June 1, 1883, to Miss Frances C. Hawkins, a native of Illinois. They have two children: Mary E. and Eliza M. They are members of the Lutheran Church. SALATHIAL TALBOT, sections 4 and 5, originally from Barber County, West Virginia, was born October 3, 1832. His parents Robert and Mary (Woodford) Talbot, were both natives of that county, and were there reared and married. They had a family of thirteen children, of whom our subject was the seventh child. He was brought up on his father's farm, and when nineteen years of age began school teaching, which profession he continued six years. In the fall of 1865 he moved to Henry County, Missouri, and resided there till 1872, then returning home. In 1875 he again came to Missouri and located in St. Clair County on his present place. His farm contains 320 acres of choice land in excellent cultivation. Mr. Talbot was married March 1, 1854, to Miss Rachel Dickison, of West Virginia. They have had eleven children, eight of whom are now living: Jasper M., L. D. M., Demetrias W., Salathial S., Mary B., Harriet L. Rosa G. and Myrtle A. They are members of the Baptist Church. During the war Mr. T. enlisted, in 1862, in Company E, Sixty-second Virginia Regiment, and was acting quartermaster of the same toward the close of the war, and at the surrender of General Lee he was commissary of the Twentieth Virginia Regiment. The following information was generously provided by Will Babb, a descendant of Salathial Talbot: "One daughter of Salathial Talbot was Lillie Harriet Talbot, my grandmother and mother to my father, Lee Talbot Babb. Inside the Bible belonging to Lillie Talbot I recently found a handwritten note: ................................................................ Jasper N. Talbot was borned 29feb1856 Dee Talbot 23 may 1858 Met Talbot 26 dec 1860 SJ Talbot 20 feb 1863 Belle Talbot 27 mar 1870 Lillie Talbot 27 feb 1872 Rosa Talbot 17 jul 1874 Myrtle Talbot 17 dec 1878 Father 3 oct 1832 Mother 28 nov 1836" JOHN F. TALLY, farmer and miller, was born in St. Clair County. Missouri, November 15, 1851, and was the son of George W. Tally, who was born December 30, 1824, in Virginia. His mother, formerly Miss Amanda Kincade, was born January 21, 1829, and was also a Virginian by birth. They were married in 1846, in St. Clair County, Missouri, and are the parents of nine children, five now living. Mr. T. came to Pike County, Missouri, in an early day, and soon after moved to St. Clair County with his parent, his father-in-law, Mr. Kincade, also being one of the early settlers of the county. John F. Tally married Miss Laura J. Wheeler, of this county, August 7, 1873. They have two children living: Thirza H. and John A. George W. was born May 1, 1874, and died December 7, 1874. Mr. T. erected his steam saw mill in 1882, and is now doing a good business. There is attached to it a run of stone for grinding corn, which is well patronized. Politically he is a Democrat and together with his wife, belongs to the Baptist Church of Wright's Creek. THOMAS TERRY, the son of James and Nancy P. Terry, was born in King William County, Virginia, on the 25th of December, 1817. His father, a native of the same county, was born in 1778, and died there. In 1797 his marriage occurred, his wife also being a Virginian by birth, and they had a family of ten children, of whom Thomas was the ninth child. In 1842, leaving the state of his birth, he emigrated to St. Louis County, Missouri, and after living there. for eight years, moved to St. Clair County, which has since been his home. About the year 1845, he was married in Cole County, Missouri, to Miss Mary J. Walser, a daughter of Squire P. Walser. They have had ten children: Elizabeth A., Squire Walser, Elvira, Cass, John S., Eliza, Daniel Elias, Magoon, Stanton, and Albert G. In politics, Mr. Terry is a Republican, though never having taken any active part in political matters. He is connected with the Baptist denomination. ERVIN THOMAS, farmer, section 10, was born in Grayson County, Virginia, June 16, 1812. His father, Nathan Thomas, born in North Carolina, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war under General Green, and was at the battle of Guilford court house, North Carolina. Ervin's grandparents were originally from Wales. His mother, formerly, Rebecca Pool, (of English parentage) came from North Carolina. He was the ninth of ten children. After the war his father moved into Virginia, when he bought a farm. Young Ervin remained at home for several years, and for a time was in Florida. In 1839 he came to Missouri and settled in Roscoe Township, near where he now lives. In 1849 he went to California with William Walters and others and remained three years. He now has a finely improved farm of 120 acres. During the late war General Lyon's army destroyed nearly all his property while on their raid after Price's army, and then Mr. Thomas joined Price for protection. He was out six months. He married Nancy Crider, November 17, 1833, in Grayson County, Virginia. She was the daughter of Henry Crider, of Virginia. They have four children living: Margaret Ann (now Mrs. Thomas Hackett, of Kansas City), Jane (Mrs. Thomas J. Sherley, who died in 1881), Sarah (now Mrs. H. Gest), Susan (wife of Charles Bidell), and Edwin E., now in Colorado. Politically he is a Democrat. He belongs to the Christian Church, and is a member of the Masonic order. S. C. AND R. B. THOMAS, farmers; section 33, are among the prominent citizens and early settlers of St. Clair County. S. C. was born on section 33 of this (Chalk Level) township February 11, 1846. His father, Elisha Thomas, was a native of North Carolina and came to St. Clair County in 1839. The mother of our subjects, whose maiden name was Jane W. Goff, came originally from Tennessee. S. C. was the eighth of a family of twelve children. He went to Henry County, Missouri, in 1864, where he followed farming for some time, then returning to St. Clair County. R. B. Thomas was born June 21, 1848. His youth was spent, like that of his brother, on the farm in this county. They own 185 acres of farm land, 100 acres of which are in cultivation. The senior Thomas died May 9, 1862, and his widow October 5, 1873. WILLIAM L. THOMAS (deceased) was born in Nicholas County, Kentucky, August 9, 1809. He was there brought up, following farming till 1850, when he came to Saline County, Missouri. Here he was engaged in farming and stock dealing till 1865. Going to St. Charles County, Missouri, he continued to reside in that locality till 1871, in which year he came to St. Clair County, and at that time had some 1,000 acres of choice land. Mr. Thomas was married May 16, 1866, to Miss Lizzie McFadden, a daughter of John McFadden, of Henry County, Kentucky. Mr. Thomas' death occurred May 8, 1880. He was through life an honest, upright and enterprising man, and his liberality, kindness and benevolence were well known. Almost the last act of this man was a generous one. Mrs. Thomas, since her husband's death, has successfully managed the most of his estate. She is beloved and respected by all who know her. WILLIAM F. THOMPSON was born January 10, 1836, in Simpson County, Kentucky, and was the son of Tillman Thompson, who was also born in Kentucky in 1811. He lived in that state until 1840, when he came to this county, locating where the subject of this sketch now resides. In 1834 he married Miss Adaline Earnest, daughter of Jacob and Lucinda Earnest. They had twelve children: William F., Jacob, Monroe, Carrol, Edwin, Matilda, Perry, Ellen, Paulina, George, Cornelius and Lomba. William F. remained at home until 1858, and on March 24th of that year was united in marriage with Miss Leah Culbertson, of St. Clair County, and a daughter of Isaac Culbertson, mention of whom is made elsewhere in our history. To them eleven children were born: Paulina, born in 1861; Adaline, born in 1863; Harriet, born in 1865; one unnamed, born in 1867; Julia, born in 1868; Sherman, born in 1870; Flora, born in 1872; Logan, born in 1874; Della, born in 1876; Lulu, born in 1879; and Genevia, born in 1882. Of these only five are now living. Mr. Thompson is the owner of 150 acres of excellent land, and to some extent is engaged in the stock business. Politically he is a Republican. WILLIAM H. TILLERY owes his nativity to Knox County, Tennessee, having been born there September 20, 1840. His parents, Sampson and, Catharine (Yoast) Tillery, both of Knox County, were married December 23, 1840. The former was born January 17, 1791. William H. was the twelfth of a family of thirteen children. In August, 1859, he was united in marriage with Miss Martha E. Parker, of Knox County, Tennessee. In October following, leaving his native county, he came to St. Clair County, Missouri, and settled on the farm now owned by J. P. Butcher in this township. In 1860 their eldest child, Mary L., was born, and since then they have had nine children: Sampson M., Emily T., Catharine E., C. L., William M.. James J., John A., Frederick M. and Lulu G. The family has never experienced a day of sickness, and with one exception, when the arm of Emily was broken, never has a physician been in the house for the purpose of administering medical relief. Mr. T. was formerly a very extensive dealer in mules, and was the acknowledged leader of this industry in this vicinity. In 1880, on account of failing health, he discontinued the business, and now devotes his attention to the cultivation of his farm, one of the finest in the township, situated on Coon Creek, and under good improvements. Politically, he is a staunch Republican. He is a Master Mason and a prominent member of the Grange in this township. Mr. Tillery once had a narrow escape from death, the circumstances of which were as follows: "Having been deputized, in August, 1880, to serve a warrant of arrest on a horse thief who had previously stolen a horse in that district, he started after the criminal, overtook and arrested him, and while returning to Osceola, his attention being directed to other parties coming down the road, the thief with great rapidity drew his revolver and fired at Mr. T., the ball entering his neck just back of the jugular vein on the right side, and passing behind the throttle, came out on the left side; it then entered the shoulder, and glancing back from the blade, fell into his vest pocket." JAMES W. TITUS, farmer and stock raiser, section 18, was born in Loudoun County, Virginia, February 22, 1839, his parents, Jeremiah and Susan (Goodheart) Titus having been Virginians by birth. James W. was the oldest of a family of six children. When sixteen years old he was taken by his father to Muskingum County, Ohio, where he grew to manhood. He farmed in Ohio until 1860, when he moved to Coles County, Illinois, continuing his former occupation until 1868, when he came to St. Clair County, Missouri. He owns a farm of 183 acres, well improved. Mr. T. has worked at the carpentering business for the last twenty years. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company H, Seventy-ninth Illinois Volunteers, and was discharged December 15, 1863. He is a member of the M. E. Church, and belongs to both the Masonic fraternity and the Grange. February 23, 1860, he married Miss Caroline Roberts, of Ohio. They have seven children: S. A., Martha S., Lydia, Thomas J., James F. John H. and Ira N. They lost two children. D. C. TREMAIN, M.D. section 3, is a son of Edwin Tremain, who was born in England in May, 1803, and who was married in Ohio to Miss Sarah Hutsell, born in that state in February, 1804. They now reside in Vinton County, Ohio. They had a family of four children, D. C. being the second child. He was born in Athens, (now Vinton County) Ohio, March 26, 1843. He was there reared and received the advantage of a common school education, after which he entered the Normal School of Lebanon. In June, 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Fourth Virginia of the Federal army, and remained in services four months, when he was mustered out as commissary of subsistence. Returning to Ohio he continued the study of medicine, which he had began previous to the war, and in 1836 was graduated from the Ohio Medical College. In 1877 he located in Johnson County, Kansas, having received the appointment from the governor as physician and surgeon for the Shawnee Indians. He held that appointment for two years, but continued the practice of medicine in that county until 1876, when he came to St. Clair County, Missouri. Here he is considered to be one of the most prominent in the profession. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity, and the encampment. Dr. T. was married September 26, 1859, to Miss Lizzie Evans. She was born in Mason County, Kentucky, September 24, 1850. They have three children: Dema, Ralph and Mabel. JOHN H. TRISSEL, postmaster at Lowry City, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, February 28, 1846, being the son of Joseph and Rachael (Garwood) Trissel. His youth was spent in Ohio and he was educated in the common schools, following engineering in that state until 1889, when he came to St. Clair County, Missouri. Here he manufactured brick for one year, after which he gave his attention to farming and carpentering until 1873. Returning to Ohio he was employed as engineer until 1878, when he again came to St. Clair County. August 1, 1881, he was appointed postmaster, which position he now fills. In June, 1862, he enlisted in Company K, First Ohio Heavy Artillery and was discharged July 25, 1865. He is a member of the M. E. Church and belongs to the I. O. O. F. fraternity. August 25, 1868, Mr. Trissel married Miss Elizabeth J. Houk, a daughter of George W. and Caroline (Simmon) Houk, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Maryland. Mr. and Mrs. T. have a family of six children. Harvey L., Lucy A., Garlie, Callie, George and Bessie. T. F. TRUE, farmer, section 20, was born in Dearborn County, Indiana, October 4, 1845, being a son of Nelson and Mary E. (Piles) True, also natives of Indiana. T. F. was reared and educated in the county of his birth, where he was engaged in farming till 1866. Then he came to St. Clair County, Missouri, and now owns a farm of 220 acres. In 1861 he enlisted in Company G, Fifty-seventh Indiana, remaining in service till the close of the war. Mr. True was married July 5, 1867, to Miss Fannie Tives, a native of Moniteau County, Missouri. They have four children: Nelson, William A., Laura J. and Charles F. JOHN RYLAND TUCKER, a native of Johnson County, Missouri, was born in 1842, being the youngest child in a family of four sons and four daughters. Early Tucker, his father, was born in Lincoln County, Kentucky, February 4, 1802, and followed farming there until 1832, when he removed to Lafayette (now Johnson) County, Missouri. Soon after his settlement there he built a cabin, having to send fourteen miles for men to assist in raising it. About the year 1827 he was married to Lucretia Owsley, a niece of George Owsley and a native of Lincoln County, Kentucky. John R. remained upon the farm of his father, in Johnson County, until February 9, 1862, when he was married to Jane Richardson, of that county. To them were born six children, but three only survive: Logan M., Lulu Belle and Lilly May. Mr. T. was at one time a Republican in his political views, but is now connected with the "National" party. His wife is a member of the M. E. Church, South. JOHN T. TUCKER is a native of Gasconade County, Missouri, and was born in 1853, being the son of Thomas and Jane (Miller) Tucker, both originally from Tennessee, the former having been born in 1830. They were married in 1852. In 1866 John T., still a small boy, came to this township, and has since continued to reside here. In 1874 he was married to Miss Mary Walters, a daughter of William Walters, and by this marriage there were four children, three of whom survive: William C., Nellie F. and Effie. One died in infancy. Mr. T. is by occupation a farmer, but occasionally follows the trade of blacksmith, in which he is quite an adept. WILLIAM TUCKER, a twin brother of Elizabeth Tucker, was born in Lincoln County, Kentucky, in 1828, the eldest of a family of eight children, seven of whom grew to maturity. Early Tucker, his father, who was also born in Lincoln County in 1802. remained there occupied in farming and trapping until 1832, when he emigrated to Johnson (at that period Lafayette) County, bringing his entire possessions in an ox-cart, while the family, who were large enough to do so, walked by the way. After his arrival here in order to build a cabin he was compelled (as elsewhere stated) to send fourteen miles for help to raise the structure. Previous to this, in 1827, he had married Miss Lucretia Owsley, of Lincoln County, Kentucky, and a niece of Governor Owsley. William was brought up in this vicinity upon a farm, and while school was held attended the sessions, though compelled to travel a distance of four miles through a trackless forest to the school house. On January 11, 1846, he was married to Miss Amanda Bazzill, daughter of Ezekiel Bazzill. To them were born six children: Mary F., born in 1851; Samuel H., born in 1853; James M., born in 1855; Melvin J., born 1856; John F., born in 1860; and William P., born in 1866. Mr. Tucker was brought up a Whig, afterwards voted the Democratic ticket and is now a Greenbacker. He is a member of the M. E. Church, South, belongs to the Grange and also to the Masonic fraternity. He is the owner of a most excellent farm in section 7, and upon it raises considerable stock, the quality and purity of which is surpassed by none, and in numbers but few are in advance of him. In 1850 Mr. Tucker's brother Henry, together with William Smith and a man named Moore, left Johnson County for the gold fields of California. Within three years Smith and Moore died, and Henry Tucker, having amassed quite a fortune, began to make preparations for his return. Starting he got as far as Boonville, where, overtaken by robbers, he was poisoned, stripped of even his clothes, robbed of his hard earned money, and placed upon the stage in an unconscious condition for Georgetown, where he arrived but he never knew his own father, who met him at that point. William Tucker now has in his possession the purse that contained the money of his murdered brother. GARLAND C. TURNER, farmer and stock raiser, section 17, was born in Simpson County, Kentucky, September 25, 1835. His father, John Turner, was a native of Kentucky as also was his mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Bluette. Garland was reared and educated in his native county, and there resided till 1870 when he moved to Henry County, Missouri, and in 1881 he came to St. Clair County. He has made farming his occupation during life and now has a well improved farm of 140 acres. During his residence in Henry County he was assessor for one term under the township organization. He has always taken great interest in educational matters. Mr. Turner was married August 28, 1856, to Miss Sarah Breedlove who was born in Virginia, August 28, 1836. They have five children: John W., Sallie, Forrest E., Georgia and Bascar. Mr. and Mrs. F. are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. JOSEPH H. URICH was born November 20, 1846, in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, while his brother, Harry B., was born in Blair County of the same state. Their father, a carpenter by trade and also a farmer, was born December 21, 1818, in York County, Pennsylvania, and now resides in Cook County, Illinois. He was married in 1844 to Miss Elizabeth Drawbaugh, of Cumberland County, born September 18, 1818. Their family consisted of William, who died in infancy, John D., Joseph H., Harry B., Martha R. (now Mrs. E. C. McCloud), Edward O., and David, who also died while an infant. Mrs. Urich died March 21, 1877. Joseph H. (our subject) leaving his native state in August, 1865, settled in Grundy County, Illinois, where he remained for four years. In August, 1869, he came to this county. August 21, 1871, he married Miss Henrietta M. Peebly, daughter of Thomas A. and Margaret Ann Peebly. She died September 27, 1882, leaving three children: Hamilton W., born March 10, 1872; Mattie E., born December 9, 1874, and Della May, born August 23, 1877. Harry B. Urich, upon removing from Pennsylvania in April, 1863, went to Morris, Grundy County, Illinois, where he lived for fourteen years; then, on account of failing health, he visited Florida for eighteen months and returned north as far as St. Clair County, Missouri. In April, 1881, in connection with his brother, he erected a saw mill, and they are also associated together in farming and raising stock. Mrs. H. M. Urich was a member of the Christian Church. Joseph H. Urich is a Democrat, while his brother is Republican in politics. The former belongs to the A. F. & A. M. fraternity. Thomas Ashford Peebly was born December 10, 1811, in Knoxville, Tennessee, and in 1818 accompanied his parents to Howard County, Missouri. Moving to St. Clair County in 1834, he purchased land. He owned at his death 530 acres. December 11, 1839, he married Miss Margaret A. Hoover. Her mother, with five children, came to this county in 1835. Mr. and Mrs. Peebly had five children: Mary J., born July 20, 1841, married Paris Brown July 11, 1861, and died June 10, 1862; Martha A., born April 4, 1843 (wife of David Tapping); James, born March 15, 1845, died October 11 following; Ellen, born October 28, 1847, died November 7, 1847, and Henrietta M., whose death is recorded above. Mr. P. died February 14, 1876, and his widow now resides upon the old estate. JAMES B. VAUGHAN, a native of Coffee County, Tennessee, was born in 1840, his parents being Obediah and Nancy Vaughan. The former was born in Culpeper County, Virginia, in 1821, and early emigrating to Tennessee, was married there in 1839. He continued to live in that state until James was two years old, when, in 1842, he came with the family to St. Clair County, Missouri. He was a hardy pioneer, and endured many hardships in his new home. Being a great trapper and hunter, he found ample time here to engage. in this sport. Young Vaughan spent his early life in this county, tilling the soil in summer and hunting during the winter months, and he well remembers when the hide of the deer, wolf, etc., was the currency of the day. In 1858 he married Miss Martha Lord, daughter of James Lord, one of the oldest settlers of St. Clair County. To them were born nine children, eight of whom are living: Nancy E., Sarah, Mary, Maudy, Daisy, Emma and Eddy. Sarah F. died when two years old. Mr. V. is a Republican in his political preferences, and he is a member of the Baptist Church at Bear Creek. GEORGE WAGNER, farmer and stock raiser, section 17. The subject of this sketch is one of the prominent men of Speedwell Township and one worthy of mention in the history of this county. He is a native of Germany and was born January 28, 1826. When but four years old he was brought to America by his parents, who located at Petersburg, Virginia. George there received the benefits of the common schools, and in 1842 he went back to Germany, where he entered the Heidelberg University of Baden-Baden. There he took a thorough course in surveying, engineering and jurisprudence, learning the Greek, Latin and Hebrew languages. He was graduated from that institution in 1847. Returning to Petersburg, Virginia, he was engaged in ornamental gardening, at which he accumulated a large amount of wealth. This was all lost during the war. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate service and was made regimental quartermaster of Roger A. Pryor's regiment, and after a short time was promoted to brigade quartermaster, which position he filled for eight months. After that time he filled the position of first assistant chief quartermaster of General Longstreet's corps until the surrender of General Lee. After the close of the war he remained in Petersburg, Virginia, for eighteen months, when he went to Kingman County, Kansas. He was occupied in farming and raising stock till 1878, when he came to St. Clair County, Missouri. Here he now has 320 acres of land, eighty acres in Vernon County and 320 acres of good farming land in Kansas, and he is one of the most practical farmers of this county. In 1874 he was elected probate judge of Kingman County, Kansas, which office he held four years. Mr. W. is a member of the Masonic fraternity. In February, 1849, he was married to Miss Caroline Bloom, a native of Virginia. She died in 1878, leaving five children: George, Herman, William, Caroline and Louisa. He was married again in July, 1881, to Mrs. Mary J. Price, of Ohio. Her maiden name was Russell. Mr. and Mrs. W. are members of the Baptist Church. DAVID WALKER, farmer, section 17, a native of Darke County, Ohio, was born January 7, 1842, being the son of Alexander and Catherine (Sheppard) Walker, natives of Virginia. David was the fourth child of a family of ten children. In 1856 his parents moved to St. Clair County, Missouri, where he arrived at manhood, engaging in farming and stock raising. His farm is well improved and contains 120 acres. His fine residence was built in 1881. Mr. W. was in the Missouri State Militia during the late war. February 23, 1864, he married Miss Frances Kellerinan, who was born in Indiana May 9, 1842. They have seven children: William, Anna B., James P., Mary E., Charles, Minnie A. and Cora. JOHN WALKER, farmer, section 21, was born in Miami County, Ohio, May 12, 1834. His father, Alexander Walker, a native of West Virginia, was a son of James Walker, a Virginian by birth and a soldier in the war of 1812. The maiden name of John's mother was Catherine Sheppard, originally from Maryland. John was reared in Ohio and was educated in the common schools. In 1856 he came to St. Clair County, Missouri, where he has since followed farming, now owning eighty acres of good land, well watered, etc. Mr. W. has held a number of township offices, among which are those of trustee and constable. September 18, 1856, he was married to Miss Mary Riegel, a native of Ohio. They have nine children: Sarah A., Jacob A., Nehemian, Lydia, John L., James M., Oliver S., Rudolph and Nellie M. P. WALLACE, farmer, section 7, was born in Hancock County, Indiana, November 22, 1850. His father, John J. Wallace, a native of North Carolina, was married to Miss Eliza Sergeant, of Indiana, who now lives in Bates County, her husband being deceased. The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in the county of his birth. When about seventeen years old he came to Missouri and located in Bates County, where he lived until 1875, then coming to his present location. Here he now has a farm of 160 acres. He was married February 5, 1873, to Miss Naomi F. Fleemer, who was born in Monroe County, Indiana, July 30, 1853. She was a daughter of Samuel and Mary (Hendricks) Fleemer, the former of Indiana, and the latter of Kentucky. The family of Mr. W. consists of two children, Minnie and Eva. They are members of the Christian Church. SAMUEL ADAMS WARDEN, attorney at law, is the fourth of a family of nine children born to Samuel and Loretta (Richards) Warden, natives of Pennsylvania. Samuel was born in Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, July 27, 1838. He received a practical education in youth and when seventeen years of age was employed as a clerk in a store, where he remained two years, and during his leisure hours read law. He subsequently took a commercial course in bookkeeping and was employed as a bookkeeper in Chicago and St. Louis, but the business being too confining he went to Cooper County, Missouri, in 1866. The following three years he was interested in agricultural pursuits. Having early formed a desire to become a lawyer, he resumed the study of law, and in 1869 was admitted to the bar by Judge Rice in Cooper County. In 1871 he opened an office in Sedalia and lived there ten years. In May, 1881, he removed to Osceola. Mr. W. was married June 4, 1862, in St. Louis to Miss Virginia E. Fisher, a daughter of W. P. Fisher, a native of Virginia. Mrs. Warden died December 22, 1882, leaving two children: William Fisher and Beverly S. Mr. W. is a prominent member of the Greenback party and he started the Labor Greenback Advocate in Sedalia, the first paper of its kind in the state. He has rendered his party efficient service as a forcible and effective speaker. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and the A. O. U. W. lodges. PHILIP WARNER, section 11, a native of Washtenaw County, Michigan, was born February 28, 1858, and is a son of Abraham and Barbara (Layer) Warner, who were natives of Germany. Philip spent his youth on the farm at his birthplace, receiving a common school education. In the fall of 1870 he came to Missouri and bought land and settled in St. Clair County. Here he has a farm of eighty acres. Mr. Warner was married in this county September 17, 1878, to Mrs. Mollie Ruebush, a widow of Joseph Ruebush, and a daughter of Henry R. Holden. She has one child by her former marriage, Thomas Ruebush. Mr. and Mrs. W. have two children, Birdie B. and Harry T. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. ELDER WILLIAM WILCOX WARREN was born in Boyle County, Kentucky, June 25, 1837, and was the son of Dr. William W. Warren, who was born in Kentucky, in 1808, he being of English ancestry. He received a liberal education, and was graduated at the Transylvania University of Kentucky. After practicing for some time he went to Mississippi, and in 1843 came to Missouri and settled in Lafayette County. He died in 1876. He married Miss Maria S. Speed, of Kentucky, who was of Scotch descent. They had nine children, of whom William was the third. He received an academic education, and in 1859, he came to St. Clair County and taught school, and he has been engaged in this occupation for many years. In 1867 he commenced preaching and in 1868, he was ordained by the Christian Church and since that date has been an active minister. He owns 700 acres of land and lives on section 14. Mr. W. married Miss Mary E. Coonce, in March, 1862. She was the daughter of Jacob Coonce, the first settler to make a home in St. Clair County in 1831. They have five children: Bailey and Wirt (twins), Mary P., Willis K., and Henry Jacob. In politics he is a Democrat. He has held the office of county school commissioner. He is a Mason and a member of the A. O. U. W. fraternity. ANDREW WAYMIRE, blacksmith at Roscoe, is a native of Warren County, Indiana, and was born October 29, 1828. He is a son of Isaac and Rachel Waymire, who were natives of Ohio. Andrew was the fourth of a family of nine children. When ten years of age he accompanied his parents to Buchanan County, Missouri, where he was reared to manhood, and he was engaged in farming in Missouri and Iowa till 1859. Then he worked at the gunsmith's trade in Iowa till 1868, when he removed to Arkansas, becoming occupied at the trade of blacksmith for three years. He worked in Lawrence County, Missouri, till 1874, when he came to Roscoe, and has since been interested in blacksmithing. Mr. Waymire was married December 1, 1846, to Miss Malissa Barrow, of Kentucky. They have five children living: Huldah, Maria, John, Charles and Albert. H. WEBER, the son of Anton and Catherine G. Weber, natives of Baden, Germany, was born in Alsace, Germany, January 9, 1851. He received a good practical education in his youth, and learned the trade of shoemaking. In 1873 he emigrated to the United States and settled in St. Louis, working at his trade in that city three years. Then he went to Clinton, Henry County, from whence, after working two years, he removed to Osceola and opened a shop. He owns a good business building, carries a complete stock of goods and is doing a successful business. Mr. Weber married Miss Louisa Morelly March 10, 1878. She is the daughter of Charles Morelly. They have two children, Charles and Florence. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. Politically he is a Republican, and in his religious preferences a Catholic. JOHN E. WELLS, hardware merchant at Roscoe, was born in Carroll County, Missouri, September 22, 1857. His parents were Daniel W. and Margaret (Craven) Wells, the former a native of Illinois, and the latter of Missouri. When John E. was an infant he was taken by his grandfather to Clay County, Missouri, where he was reared and educated. In 1875 he removed to Harrison County, Missouri and clerked in a store there, and then in Gentry County till 1878, when he came to St. Clair County, Missouri. Here he followed school teaching till the spring of 1883, when he engaged in the hardware business. He is a member of the M. E. Church, South, and belongs to the I. O. G. T. JOHN CALVIN WHALEY, M.D., comes of old revolutionary stock. His great grandfather, James Whaley, born in Virginia, removed to Kentucky at an early day. He served in the revolutionary war, and furnished his hired man with a horse and paid him a salary for service in the same cause. Edward Whaley, the son of James, came to Kentucky with his father when thirteen years old. He married and settled in Bourbon County, Kentucky. In 1819 he located lands in what is now Marion County, Missouri. He entered these lands at the first land sales in St. Louis in 1821. Albert Whaley, the father of John C., and Polly Bird were married December 21, 1826. The doctor's grandfather came to Missouri with his family and slaves in 1821 and improved the lands he had previously located. He was the first county surveyor of Marion County and a member of the first grand jury. The subject of this sketch was born in Marion County, Missouri, December 16, 1838, and was the seventh of a family of thirteen children. He was reared on a farm, and received a good practical education at McGee and St. Paul Colleges. After leaving school he taught for seven years in Texas. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate army at the call of Governor Jackson and was commissioned a first lieutenant. After the battle of Lexington he was appointed adjutant to Colonel Franklin with the rank of captain, and he served in that capacity until wounded and captured near Bragg's School House in Shelby County. He was confined at Palmyra, St. Louis and Alton and succeeded in making his escape. He rejoined Price's army in Mississippi and became a volunteer aid to General Green in the Iuka Springs expedition. He went to Texas on important duty, and after the surrender he went to New Mexico and the mountains. In 1866 he was at Waco, where he engaged in teaching school and pursuing his medical studies. He commenced his professional career in Clernard County. In 1869 he removed to Arkansas, near Fayetteville, and practiced there until 1875, when he came to Osceola, where he has since been actively pursuing his chosen profession. In connection with Mr. G. W. O'Conner he is largely interested in stock raising. Dr. W. was married in September, 1867, to Mrs. B. Deckerd, widow of B. Deckerd, who was killed in a battle in the Red River expedition. Mrs. W. has three children by her former marriage: Hugh, Ben and Bettie. Dr. and Mrs. W. have one son. Politically, the doctor is a Democrat, and he is also a Mason. DR. J. W. WHEELER, merchant at Johnson City, was born in Dearborn County, Indiana, September 7, 1844, his parents being Captain Piercy and Jerusha Ann (Holiday) Wheeler. In July, 1862, when in his eighteenth year, J. W. enlisted in the Ninety-first Indiana volunteer infantry, and after nine months service he re-enlisted in the 105th regiment. After four months in this regiment he again re-enlisted in the 147th, and served till discharged in June, 1865. After his discharge he returned home and attended school at Moors' Hill College for two years and received a good education in the English branches. In the fall and winter of 1867 and 1868 he took a course of lectures at the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical College. Coming to Missouri in the spring of 1868, he commenced the practice of his profession at Hudson, Bates County. The following year he came to St. Clair County and located at Johnson City, and has since continued in the practice at this place. The Doctor has built up a large patronage and is accounted one of the most successful physicians in the county. He engaged in the drug business in 1870, and in 1878 he added a complete stock of general merchandise. He is identified with the Republican party; was elected township collector and collected the tax for two years. He owns about 1,300 acres of land in St. Clair County, about 600 acres of which are improved, besides considerable town property and land in Cedar County. He is extensively occupied in feeding cattle and hogs for the market. The doctor is a man of good business habits and qualifications, and has made what property he owns since coming to the county. He was married here December 8, 1870, to Miss Ariadnah Isabelle Peck, a daughter of John W.. Peck, of Greencastle, Indiana. They have two children: Glennie F. and Harry P. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. CHARLES M. WHITE, of the firm of White Bros., druggists, is a native of Cedar County, Missouri, and was born April 15, 1855. When he was four years old the family removed to Morgan County, Missouri, where he was reared to manhood there also receiving his education. When seventeen years old he engaged in the drug business as clerk at Versailles, Missouri, where he remained one year. Then he held a like position at Otterville, Missouri, for two years. He subsequently went to Bonham, Texas, and after residing there one year, returned to Missouri and for two years made his home at Pilot Grove. Then he embarked in the drug trade at Houstonia, where he carried on business two years. The following year he spent as a commercial traveler for a Sedalia house. He removed to Colorado and was engaged in mining from the spring of 1879 to the spring of 188i, when he came to Appleton City, and with his brother purchased their present stock of drugs. They are now doing an excellent business. ROBERTSON WHITE, farmer and stock dealer and the owner of 500 acres of land, was born in Sussex County, New Jersey, June 13, 1813. He was the son of John White, of New Jersey, and his grandfather was born in Scotland, His mother was formerly Jane Robertson, daughter of Robert Robertson, of New Jersey. John White was in the war of 1812. He had a family of twelve children, of whom four sons and two daughters are now living. In 1815 the family moved to Guernsey County, Ohio, and thence to Muskingum County, where they remained for many years. In 1836 Robertson went to Knox County, Illinois, entered a farm and improved 160 acres. In 1850 he took a trip to California, working in the mines while there. In 1861 he moved to California with his family, and after remaining two years, the climate not agreeing with his wife's health, he sold out and returned by way of New York, arriving in Knox County May 1, 1864. In 1866 Mrs. W. died, leaving five children: Aaron, Henry, George, Francis and Hattie. In 1867 he married Charlotte Ramboe, of Pennsylvania, a daughter of George Ramboe. By this union they have five children: John, Stella, Elizabeth, Theodore and Stephen A. Douglas. Politically he is a Democrat. Mrs. White is a Presbyterian. He is a Mason. He now resides on section 32. T. E. WILKINSON, farmer, section 11, was born in Warren County, Tennessee, February 28, 1836. His parents, Charles and Malissa (Cantrell) Wilkinson, were natives of South Carolina, and his great grandfather was a general in the Revolutionary war. When T. E. was about two years old the family moved to Missouri and located in Crawford County where they resided until he was sixteen years old, then going to Gasconade County. There he grew to manhood, receiving his education in the common schools. He followed farming in that county until 1870, when he came to St. Clair County. His present farm contains 170 acres of land. Mr. W. is a member of the Baptist Church and also belongs to the Masonic fraternity. November 25, 1860, he was married to Miss Sarah Walton, a native of Missouri. They have five children: Elizabeth M., George W., Mary M., Eliza B. and John T. They have lost two children. JOHN S. WILSON, dealer in general merchandise at Chalk Level, was born in Warsaw, Benton County, Missouri, January 26, 1848. and was a son of Dr. Joel Y. Wilson, a native of Kentucky, whose father, John D. Wilson, was a Virginian by birth and of Irish ancestry. The mother of John S. was formerly Mary Burch, a native of Virginia. John S. was the eldest of a family of six children. He grew to manhood in his native county and was there educated, being for many years engaged as clerk in different localities. He was for three years conductor on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. In 1880 he located in Chalk Level, having previously been engaged in business at Appleton City for two years. He now carries a stock of drugs and other articles of merchandise and is doing a good business. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. Mr. Wilson was first married to Miss Fannie Campbell, a native of Missouri, who died August 4, 1870, leaving two children: Annie and William Y. He was again married February 8, 1873, to Miss Annie Van Allen, originally from New York. JOSEPHUS WINCHESTER, section 4, was born August 4, 1815, in Guilford County, North Carolina, his parents being William and Margaret (Witty) Winchester, natives of the same state. In 1830 the family removed to Kentucky and located in Callaway County. Josephus, the second son of five sons and seven daughters, spent his youth on a farm in that county, and was married May 14, 1839, to Miss Nancy Ann Rayburn, a daughter of John Rayburn. She was a native of Stewart County, Tennessee, but removed to Kentucky when a child and there grew to maturity. Mr. Winchester, after his marriage, resided in Kentucky about eleven years, coming to Missouri in 1850, and locating in St. Clair County. Here he bought land and improved the farm where he now resides, it containing 300 acres with about 100 under fence. He has nine children: Newton L., Eliza J. (widow of S. Hoover), Melinda (wife of C. Weir), Emily (wife of Lee Carroll), Rebecca (wife of D. L. Herndon), James J., Margaret (wife of C. S. Reding), William W. and E. C. Mr. and Mrs. Winchester are members of the Baptist Church. The former belongs to the Masonic fraternity. JOHN S. WINGFIELD, was born in March, 1816, in Virginia, his parents being Christopher and Nancy (Stockton) Wingfield, also Virginians by birth, who were married in 1814. The former was born in 1788, and the latter in 1793. John S. the eldest of ten children, was brought up in the county of his birth, and lived at home principally until his marriage, in 1847, to Miss Harriet M. Bondurant. They have had ten children: Mary F, Christopher T., Millard F., Nancy J., Sarah E., Susan L., Charles P., Harriet M., and James M., and of this number three have died. In 1859 Mr. W. came to St. Clair County, locating in Collins Township, where he has since lived, gaining for himself an enviable reputation. The Republican party, recognizing his ability, nominated him for the position of county judge, but the Democratic party being in the majority, he failed to be elected. Mr. Wingfield's farm, one of the best to be found in the eastern part of the county, consists of 210 acres on the Weaubleau Creek. ALONZO C. WINTERS, plasterer at Lowry City, was born in Pike County, Illinois, March 20, 1858, and was the son of Benjamin B. and Emeline (Cobb) Winters, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of New York. Alonzo was reared in his native state and was there educated. His father was a plasterer by trade and the son worked with him in Illinois until 1877, when he came to St. Clair County, Missouri. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity. March 13, 1881, Mr. Winters was married to Miss Lula Gracy, a native of Indiana. They have one child, Irving B. Mr. and Mrs. Winters belong to the M. E. Church. JOHN A. WISNER was born May 3, 1837, and was a native of Canton Basel, Switzerland, where his parents, Adam and Catharine Wisner, were also born, the former in October, 1811, and the latter March 23, 1817. They were married April 6, 1836, and had seven sons and six daughters. and of this number two sons and three daughters have died. Emigrating to America in 1843, they first settled in Virginia, purchasing 100 acres of land and remaining upon it for four years. In 1847 Mr. W. sold this property, went to Sciota County, Ohio, and three years later removed to Van Buren County, Iowa, where he bought a forty acre tract. After residing in Iowa about six years, he came to Cooper County, Missouri, in the spring of 1859, and in 1860 to St. Clair County. He bought 160 acres of land in this township, but in two years exchanging places. secured one of 170 acres in Osceola Township, where he lived until his death, July 30, 1871. His widow now resides with one of her sons in this township. John A. Wisner, our subject, was married April 1, 1860, to Miss Lora Clark, of Van Buren County, Iowa. They have eight children: Joseph, born January 29, 1861; Sarah, born September 1, 1862, (wife of George W. Garrison, of this county); Martha A., born March 20, 1864; Laura and Lora, (twins) born April 29, 1867; Jessie, born December 17, 1869; Jeremiah, born May 16, 1872, and Adam Clark, born January 30, 1875. In 1866 Mr. Wisner purchased a farm of eighty- two acres in Polk Township, upon which he still resides. In 1876 he was nominated and elected to the position of magistrate, and was re- elected in 1878 and again in 1880, still holding that office. Mrs. W. and five children are members of the M. E. Church. He is a Democrat. P. B. WONACOTT, school teacher, was born in Cass County, Illinois, in 1853, and was the son of K. B. Wonacott, who was married in 1841 to Margaret Bell, of Virginia. They were the parents of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the eighth in number. He remained at home until at the age of twenty-three years, when he entered school at Weaubleau Institute, remaining there for two years, and then left thoroughly prepared for the duties of teaching. On May 9, 1848, Mr. W. married Miss Nannie J. McConnell, daughter of Joseph McConnell. They have two children, Maggie and Lawson. He is a Greenbacker in his political faith and a member of the M. E. Church. He is at present teaching school in this township. I. M. WOODALL, county treasurer and one of the most worthy and popular officials of St. Clair County, was born in St. Clair County, Missouri, in May, 1845, and was the son of Christopher Woodall, of Virginia, who came to this state in 1840. The mother of I. M. was formerly Margaret Simms, who was born in Virginia, and died in 1847. Mr. W. died in 1858. They left six children, of whom our subject is the youngest. He made the best use of his limited opportunities for acquiring an education in youth. He now owns a farm of 265 acres on section 21, in Collins Township. He was collector under the township organization, and has been a leading citizen in the township and county for many years. In 1882 he was elected county treasurer, and entered upon the duties of his office January 1, 1883. He enlisted in the Fifteenth Missouri Cavalry, Company M. for two years, and was mustered out at Springfield, Missouri, July 17, 1865. Mr. Woodall married Miss Minnie Fletcher in 1867. She was the daughter of Nathan and Sarah (Barnett) Fletcher, of Georgia. They have four children: John D., William, Sarah Margaret and James Francis. Mr. W. is a Democrat and a member of the Baptist Church. JOHN J. C. WOOLF was born in Caldwell County, Kentucky, on the 20th of June, 1817, his father being Alfred Woolf, of the same county, born July 26, 1784. He was married in 1812, his wife, a Kentuckian by birth, having been born in 1786. John J. C. Woolf was united in marriage in 1836 to Miss Ellen Bigs, a daughter of Elisha Bigs, of the same county as himself. Soon after emigrating to Missouri, he located near Warsaw, Benton County, and upon living there for two or three years, in 1840 came to St. Clair County and settled, where he now resides, upon Weaubleau Creek. By his first marriage he had one child, a son, Henry Clay, now living in Livingston County. He was married a second time, in St. Clair County. to Miss Elizabeth Stealy, daughter of Jack Stealy, July 20, 1840. His third wife was Sealy M. Wade, to whom he was married in 1876. In 1856 Mr. Woolf purchased a mill on Weaubleau, known as Woolf's Mill, and successfully operated it during the war and after for twenty years. During the course of the civil war he remained neutral, taking no part on either side, and by his uniform courtesy and gentlemanly bearing was unmolested. He is now the owner of 1,080 acres of very fine land situated in the bottoms of Weaubleau. C. W. WRIGHT, merchant at Iconium, is a native of Washington County, Kentucky, and was born August 14, 1851, being the son of Nathaniel and Elizabeth Wright, who were married October 11, 1831. The former was born October 14, 1806, and the latter October 11, 1813, and they were the parents of twelve children, six sons and six daughters, of whom all but one son are living. C. W. Wright attended the State Normal Institution at Warrensburg, Johnson County, Missouri, where he received a good education, and after leaving the school was engaged in teaching for a few terms. In 1877 he accepted a situation as salesman at Lowry City, the style of the firm being J. P. Wright & Co., in which capacity he served for three years. Being desirous of engaging in business on his own account, he selected a site, and for eighteen months has been enjoying a fine general merchandise trade, in the southern part of this township. His present place of business was opened January 6, 1882. His stock is a complete one, and he richly merits the success which has thus far attended his career. He is acting as magistrate and is very popular in this community. EDWIN WRIGHT, farmer and stock deafer, section 5, was born in Licking County, Ohio, June 10, 1840. His parents were William S. and Samantha (Stedman) Wright, natives of Massachusetts. A colony had emigrated from Granville, Massachusetts, and located in Licking County, Ohio, when William Wright was about six years of age, hence the name of Granville, Ohio. Edwin was reared and educated in his native county, and there engaged in farming till 1859, when he came to St. Clair County, Missouri, where he resided till 1861, then returning to Ohio. He went from there with a number of men and enlisted in Company D, Thirteenth Missouri, which was afterward changed to the Twenty-second Ohio. He remained in service fourteen months, holding the position of corporal. In the fall of 1863 he went to Coles County, Illinois, and in the summer of 1865 came to St. Clair County, Missouri, where he has since followed his present occupation, having a landed estate of 880 acres. His farm is one of the best improved in this vicinity, and upon it is located a commodious and convenient residence, and one of the best barns in the county. On his farm is a number of medical springs, equal to those of Eldorado, his nearest trading point. He has also a very fine stone quarry equal to any in the state. July 27, 1864, Mr. Wright was married to Miss Fannie Bartlett, a native of Indiana. She was born in February, 1843, being a daughter of Charles and Emeline Bartlett, the former of New Hampshire and the latter of Kentucky. The family of Mr. and Mrs. W. consists of three children, Charles E., Maud and George S. GEORGE W. WRIGHT, merchant at Lowry City, is a native of Washington County, Kentucky, and was born July 4, 1844, being the son of Morgan Wright, a Kentuckian by birth, whose father, William P. Wright, was one of the pioneers of Kentucky, and a revolutionary soldier. The mother of George W., formerly Elizabeth Hickerson, was also born in Kentucky. The subject of this sketch was the sixth of a family of nine children. He grew to manhood on his father's farm, and was educated in the common schools. In October, 1861, he enlisted in Morgan's company, and was in the service until 1863. After this he returned to Kentucky and followed farming until 1865, when he began the study of medicine with Dr. J W Wright. He read with him one year, and then attended one course of lectures at Miami Medical College at Cincinnati. Returning to Kentucky he remained until 1870, when he came to St. Clair County, Missouri. In 1871 he built the first business house in Lowry City, and engaged in trade. He carries a full stock of drugs, groceries, etc., and is doing a good business. He is also proprietor of tile Wright House, an excellent hotel. Mr. W. was township clerk six years. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity. November 21, 1872, he married Miss Jennie G. Shinn, of this county. They have three children, Lillia, Minnie M. and Franklin P. JAMES POLK WRIGHT, M.D., was born in Washington County, Kentucky, December 23, 1844. His parents were Nathaniel and Matilda (Moore) Wright, natives of Virginia. James Polk grew to manhood in his native county and there received the advantages of the common schools. He was engaged in farming till 1866, when he embarked in merchandising in High Grove, Kentucky, and at the same time was occupied in reading medicine with his brother, Dr. J. W. Wright. After this he was graduated from the medical department of the University of Louisville, Kentucky. In 1871 he located at Lowry City, where he has since been interested in the practice of his profession, and he is recognized as being one of the leading citizens of that vicinity. He Is also the senior member of the firm of J. P. Wright & Co., merchants of Lowry City. He belongs to the Baptist Church, and also to the Masonic fraternity. December 14, 1879, Dr. W. was married to Miss Emma Hubner, a native of Ohio. They have one child: Walter E. DR. JOHN W. WRIGHT, was born December 20, 1836, in Washington County, Kentucky. His father, Nathaniel Wright, was born October 14, 1806, and on October 11, 1831, married Miss Elizabeth Parker, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth Parker, she was born October 11, 1813, in Culpeper County, Virginia. John W., the second child and oldest son in the family, received a good education in youth, attending the Georgetown College at Georgetown, Kentucky, where he graduated in the class of 1861. Entering the Medical College of Kentucky at Louisville, he graduated in 1863, and in 1864 was a graduate from the Louisville University, having been a member of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of that institution. He first commenced the practice of his profession at Louisville, but after remaining there one year, went to High Grove in 1865, where he had an extensive patronage for four years. April 1, 1868, he married Miss Amanda Rouse, a daughter of William A. and Amanda Rouse, of Bullitt County, Kentucky, and they have two daughters: Nancy A., born April 19, 1869, and Matilda B., born August 28, 1875. In 1870 Dr. W. purchased a tract of eighty acres of land in Jackson Township, St. Clair County, Missouri, and devoted some attention to agricultural pursuits and the raising of stock. He added, from time to time to his original purchase until he is now the owner of 1,200 acres of excellent land, several hundred acres of which are under fence and well adapted for fine stock raising to which he is giving considerable interest. In 1880 he represented this county in the state legislature and since his return has resumed his practice, which is very extensive and constantly on the increase. The doctor is a man well versed in his profession, kind and gentle to the sick and affable in his manners. He belongs to both the A. F. & A. M. and A. O. U. W. fraternities. Politically he is Democratic. NATHANIEL P. WRIGHT, M.D., a native of Washington County, Kentucky, was born May 1, 1849, and was the son of Nathaniel Wright of the same county. born October 14, 1806, who on October 11, 1831, married Miss Elizabeth Parker, who was born in Culpeper County, Virginia, October 11, 1813. Of their original family of twelve children eleven are now living: Elizabeth V., John W., Amanda F., Missouri, James K. P., Kitty H., C. W., Alice A., Anna E., Albert S., and of this number the subject of this sketch was the fifth son and eighth child. One son, Thomas J., a graduate of the medical college at Louisville, died in his native state. Nathaniel P., was educated at his birthplace, and also an attended the medical college at Louisville, where he graduated in the class of 1875-76. In 1868 the senior Wright, with his family, emigrated to St. Clair County, Missouri, settling first in Jackson and later in Polk Township. The Doctor was married November 1, 1876, to Marietta Sheldon, daughter of Albert B. and Eliza (Gardner) Sheldon, of this township, They have three children: Leo S., born December 6, 1877; Julia, born August 27, 1879; and Ethel, born January 9, 1882. Though commencing his practice against a strong and well established competition. Dr. Wright has met with flattering success, and to a patronage which he richly deserves, it extending beyond the limits of St. Clair County, into Hickory and Benton. The first mill in this locality was erected on a part of his present farm. He owns 350 acres of land and has had great success in the raising of wheat. He is a member of the Mt. Olivet Baptist Church, Henry County, and also belongs to the A. F. & A. M., and A. O. U. W. fraternities. Politically he is a Democrat. His wife is connected with the M. E. Church, South, of Bear Creek. REV. WILLIAM P. WRIGHT, pastor of the Wright Creek Baptist Church, was born in Lincoln County, Missouri December 15, 1830, his parents being William Wright, originally of Washington County, Kentucky, born in 1808, and Ann (Thomas) Wright, also a Kentuckian by birth, born in 1812. They were married in 1830, and have seven children living: William P., Elizabeth P., Morgan, Martin V., Nancy J., Milton F., and Henry F. One son, Thomas J., died in June, 1875. Coming to Missouri the senior Wright settled in Lincoln County in 1830, and after remaining there four years moved to this county (then Rives) and located in Jackson Township, where he entered eighty acres of land from the government. In 1840 selling out he bought 160 acres in Butler Township, but disposed of this in 1849 and purchased eighty acres in this township, where he remained until his death, February 15, 1854. Mrs. Wright, after being a widow for two years, married James Addington, of this county, and died in 1867. The subject of this sketch when a boy had limited advantages for acquiring an education, and being a great lover of books he was determined to prepare himself for a life of usefulness. While applying his mind to mathematics and somewhat to the sciences, he took a deep interest in the study of the Bible, and later became well versed in its truths and doctrines, which he at once put in practice. He was licensed to preach in 1854, and in 1855 was ordained a Baptist preacher by Revs. Peter Brown and James Cole, of this county. Since his ordination he has been pastor of different churches, and has been occupied in missionary work, in the old path association. His farm in section 8 contains 160 acres. He is actively engaged in farming and has done much surveying, being well learned in the principles of that science. His wife and five of his children are members of Wright Creek Church. Mr. W. married Miss Elizabeth Crabtree, of Benton County, December 18, 1850. They have eight children living: Columbus born October 24, 1851, and died August 31, 1852, Missouri A., Andrew E., W. JOSEPH YANCE, a member of the well known establishment of Stout & Co., was born in St. Clair County, Missouri, November 11, 1842. His parents were among the first settlers of Taber Township. He was reared to manhood on his father's farm and obtained his education in the common schools. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company I, Colonel Shelby's battalion, serving until paroled at Fort Scott, Kansas, in June, 1865. He then farmed in Vernon County, Missouri, for eight months, and later went to Platte County, Missouri. In the fall of 1866 he returned to St. Clair County and lived here until 1873, when he took a trip to California. After one year he came back here and farmed until 1881 Then he became identified with the firm of Stout & Co. Mr. Yance was married November 19, 1868, to Miss Mary Ketcham, of Indiana. They have four children: Bertha B., Nona K. L., Tamer B. and Louis A. FRANCIS YOAST, farmer and stock dealer, section 16, is the son of John Yoast, who was born in Germany in 1794, emigrating to the United States in 1808 with his father - a cooper by trade, he having come to this country to follow that occupation. He first located in Virginia, and after living there one year went to Ohio, and in 1810 emigrated to Knoxville, Tennessee. In 1812 John Yoast was married to Miss Elizabeth Ware, of Blount County, Tennessee. From this marriage there was born on the 23d day of December, 1814, a son, Francis. The senior Yoast, together with his family, came to Missouri in 1836, locating in Collins Township, of this county, and our subject has done much toward its improvement since his residence here. At that time this county was known as Rives, and he has often visited Osceola when it contained but one store. In 1838 one of the first, if not the first marriage ceremonies, was solemnized in Collins Township. During the late war Mr. Yoast was actively engaged in the cause of the union. He is a member of the Methodist Church and politically a Greenbacker, though formerly a Republican. He owns 265 acres of land. ANDREW YONCE, one of the pioneers of St. Clair County, who resides on section 12, of this township, is a son of John Yonce, a native of Virginia, and of German descent. Andrew was born in Wythe County, Virginia, April 3, 1810. He was there reared and educated in both English and German schools. November 10, 1830, he was married to Miss Esther Coulthard, and in 1838 they moved to St. Clair County, Missouri, locating on Big Monegaw, three miles northeast of where he now resides. He afterwards entered the land that comprises his present farm, which contains 160 acres, a portion of which is underlaid with a rich vein of coal. When he first settled in this vicinity his nearest neighbor was five miles distant and the Indians were more numerous than the white men. His trading points were Osceola and Harmony Mission, his post office being at the former place. He and his wife are members of the M. E. Church and for some two years religious services were held at their residence. Mrs. Yonce was born in England, November 25, 1814. She was a daughter of Thomas and Ester (Craig) Coulthard, who crossed the sea with nine children in 1829, and located in Wythe County, Virginia. Mrs. Y. was educated in England. Their family have numbered twelve children, nine of whom are living. Joseph T., born November 11, 1842, and married November 16, 1868, Miss Mary E. Ketcham, of Indiana; Flarvious J., born May 4, 1844, married June 5, 1873, Miss Susanna Burke; William H., born July 4, 1846, married November 14, 1875, Miss Mary E. Campbell; John A., born September 10, 1849, and married July 19, 1875, Miss Rebecca Burke; Frances, born October 11, 1840, married February 22, 1866, A. C. Ditty; Maria L., born December 12, 1847, and married April 22, 1869, A. Landon; Henrietta E., born November 6, 1853, married March 13, 1873, John B. Ditty; Florence O., born August 31, 1856, married February 4, 1877, G. L. Woolsey; Adriana C., born June 21, 1858, married July 4, 1878, H. Landon.
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